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Myths of Europe

A Theoretical Approach

Chiara Bottici

What are the myths of Europe? This article provides the conceptual framework through which this question may be approached. It begins by defining myth in such a way as to distinguish it from other forms of political symbolism and points to the distinction between cultural and political myths. From here, the relationship between mythical and historical narratives is analyzed via a study of how the main narrative cores through which Europeans have perceived themselves have worked in different periods and contexts as both. It concludes with a more detailed analysis of some of the icons that convey the myths of Europe.

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Denis Vuka

, where the dynamic aura surrounding each of these glorious historic climaxes was further heightened by the presence of a national leader. This article addresses the visual construction of the myth of the national leader in Albanian textbooks. While some

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Stéphane Baciocchi

Marcel Mauss, Henri Hubert and Robert Hertz. Saints, Heroes, Myths, and Rites. Classical Durkheimian Studies of Religion and Society, edited and translated by Alexander Riley, Sarah Daynes and Cyril Isnart, Boulder: Paradigm Publishers, ‘The Yale Cultural Sociology Series’, 2009, 221 pp.

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Parallel Myths, Popular Maps

The Europe of Soccer

Paul Dietschy, David Ranc, and Albrecht Sonntag

Although history textbooks are highly revealing sources of what is considered worthy of being included in collective memory, they only tell half the story. The study of the non-official “parallel pantheons” of popular culture also contribute significantly to understanding patterns of perception and self-perception as well as mental representations of “Europe.” For more than a century, soccer, Europe's most widely shared social practice, has contributed to shaping perceptions of what can be encompassed under the term “Europe.” This article focuses on the “popular maps” of Europe that soccer has drawn over the last half-century and hints at the myths of cultural commonality that underpin them. It appears that while soccer represents a somewhat ambiguous metaphor for contemporary Europe, it can also supply interesting insights into the emergence of horizontal bonds between Europeans.

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Brian C. Rathbun

Germany's behavior during the lead-up to the United States' invasion of Iraq in 2003 seemed to confirm that the country is marked by a strategic culture of pacifism and multilateralism. However, a closer look at German actions and pattern of participation in military operations reveals that German pacifism is a myth. There was no cross party consensus on German foreign policy in the 1990s around a principled opposition to the use of force. Even in the early years after the Cold War, the Christian Democrats began very quickly, albeit deliberatively and often secretively, to break down legal and psychological barriers to the deployment of German forces abroad. Pacifism persisted on the left of the political spectrum but gave way following a genuine ideological transformation brought about by the experience of the Yugoslav wars. The nature of Germany's objection to the Iraq invasion, which unlike previous debates did not make ubiquitous references to German history, revealed how much it has changed since the end of the Cold War. Had the election in 2002 gone differently, Germany might even have supported the actions of the U.S. and there would be little talk today of a transatlantic crisis. It is now possible to treat Germany as a "normal" European power.

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Delphine Letort

The controversies triggered by the Netflix adaptation of Jay Asher’s young adult novel Thirteen Reasons Why (2007) have focused on suicide and downplayed discussions of rape as a central plot device. Making use of stereotypical characters (such as the cheerleader and the jock) and archetypal setting (including the high school), 13 Reasons Why delves into the reassuring world of the suburban town; it deals ambiguously with the entwined notions of gender and power encapsulated in the teenpic genre. A detailed analysis of the series indeed reveals that its causative narrative reinforces the rape myth by putting the blame on girls for events that happen to them. In this article I explore the tensions of a TV series that endorses the rape myth through the entertaining frame of the teenpic.

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Writing Women's Lives: Auto/Biography, Life Narratives, Myths and Historiography

An International Symposium, 19–20 April 2014, Istanbul

Francisca de Haan

The Istanbul Women’s Library and Information Center Foundation, on occasion of its twenty-fourth anniversary, together with Yeditepe University organized the international symposium “Writing Women’s Lives: Auto/Biography, Life Narratives, Myths and Historiography,” which took place at Yeditepe University on 19–20 April 2014.

The symposium coordinators were Birsen Talay Keşoğlu, Vehbi Baysan, and Şefik Peksevgen, assisted by eleven more members of the Organizing Committee, including Aslı Davaz, director of the Istanbul Women’s Library.

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From Pioneer of Comics to Cultural Myth

Castelao in Galician Graphic Biography

David Miranda-Barreiro

, saintliness, idolatry and celebrity appear so frequently in literary biography that ‘biomythography’ is a more apposite term since it recognises the role of these aspects of myth-making. It encompasses the necessary invention of self and identity by the writer

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Ian Moll

their position of dominance against these threats than a whimpered appeal that we revive and repair the 3IR in which we actually continue to live. Thus, the ‘myth of the fourth industrial revolution’ is born: it is an ideological strategy driven by the

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Beyond the Myth of Lesbian Montmartre

The Case of Chez Palmyre

Leslie Choquette

Chevalier’s successors critiqued the naiveté of his approach, which ignored the artistic and ideological agendas of the creators of the corpus. Scholars like Adrian Rifkin and Marie-Jo Bonnet reinterpreted the literary and visual evidence as myth