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A Penchant for Protest?

Typifying Canadian Millennials’ Political Engagement

Randle J. Hart

Much has been made of the Millennial generation's seemingly low rates of political participation. Following Robert Putnam (2000) , some scholars have argued that this is part of a larger trend in wealthy democracies where political participation

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Katherine Scheil

Lady triumphs in the end. This group of Dark Lady novels both resonates with the concerns and tastes of post-millennial female readers and authors, and at times creates a more diverse and multicultural Shakespeare by linking him to a racially ‘dark

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Katie Kirakosian, Virginia McLaurin, and Cary Speck

was added to the course in the form of a final film project, 1 which is described in much greater detail shortly. By making the course open-access, multimodal and experiential, the hope was to re-engage Millennial students by galvanising the under

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The Chimes of Liberation and the Millennial Frontier

Extract of the Statement at the Conference Forum 2000, 4 September 2007

Wole Soyinka

The rise of extreme nationalism, racism and xenophobia that swept through France, Germany, the United Kingdom and even some Scandinavian countries during the past decade – a tendency that appears only very recently to have begun very slightly to reverse itself – is yet again evidence of the ease with which the collective mind can be swept up by demagoguery that appeals to that 'zone of faith' in the consciousness of most human beings. The 'nation' is only another article of faith – like religion and ideology, and an appeal to the irrational baggage that sustains it in the mind is no different from the irrational supports of religious or totalitarian orders.

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Mark L. Winer

In six weeks this Shabbat, the Christian world will commemorate the two thousandth anniversary of the birth of Jesus Christ. It really does not matter that Jesus was most likely born, according to the historians, in 4 B.C.E. It does not really matter that the mathematical start of the new millennium will be 2001. 1 January 2000 is the day of focus. Millennial madness is sweeping the world.

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Comments on Reyna

From string beings to empire au vinaigre

Jonathan Friedman

How refreshing to see this piece after so much language poured onto the pages of journals and books to demonstrate that we are in an entirely new universe, a millennial capitalism where globalization finally reigns supreme. Reyna is old-fashioned for many. He uses Marx and even, God help us, Lenin, whom he attempts to rescue by finding another route to the same conclusions concerning the highest stage of capitalism or at least the inevitability of imperialist wars.

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Debate

Religion and Environmental Apocalypse

Anna Fedele, Peter Rudiak-Gould, Terry Leahy, and Stefan Skrimshire

The year 2012 has been at the center of many millennial theories, commonly referred to under the umbrella term the “2012 phenomenon”. Th ese theories, which predicted important changes for humanity usually related to some kind of environmental apocalypse, are generally described as relating to the end of the Mayan calendar, to the common-era calendar date, 21 December 2012 (21.12.2012), and to “New Age interpretations”.

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Disruptive Technology

Social Media from Modiano to Zola and Proust

Elizabeth Emery

Abstract

In this article, Patrick Modiano’s 2014 Nobel Prize acceptance speech serves as a springboard to consider the lieu commun that “disruptive technology” is killing both literature and the contemporary press. Modiano’s depiction of himself as part of an “intermediate generation,” trapped between the intense focus of great nineteenth-century novelists and the many distractions of contemporary writers, cleverly invoked millennial anxieties related to new technology in order to establish his own place within literary history.

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John Lennon, Boxcar Politics: The Hobo in U.S. Culture and Literature, 1869–1956 Jennifer Hagen Forsberg

Grégoire Chamayou, A Theory of the Drone Adam Rothstein

Bridget T. Chalk, Modernism and Mobility: The Passport and Cosmopolitan Experience Alicia Rix

Ana Cardoso de Matos and Magda Pinheiro, eds., História Património e Infraestruturas do Caminho de Ferro: Visões do Passado e Perspetivas do Futuro Hugo Silveira Pereira

Nigel Thrift, Adam Tickell, Steve Woolgar, and William F. Rupp, eds., Globalization in Practice Regine Buschauer

Marlis Schweitzer, Transatlantic Broadway: The Infrastructural Politics of Global Performance Sunny Stalter-Pace

Michel Serres, Thumbelina: The Culture and Technology of Millennials Steven D. Spalding

NOVEL REVIEW Taiye Selasi, Ghana Must Go Lindsey Zanchettin

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Peter Caws

In this paper I am revisiting an old topic of interest, the relation of Sartre to his century. On an earlier occasion I took up the question of whether his life might count as “oracular” in the sense he lends to that term in The Family Idiot, but at that time the century still had fifteen years to go. Now I can aim for closure: between the submission of this text and its publication the millennial moment – the portentous one, whether or not the “real” one to everybody’s satisfaction – will have passed, with whatever upheaval may have been attendant on it. We can imagine at least that it would have presented no problem to Sartre.