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Daniel O'Shiel

Sartrean conceptions of the Ego, emotions, language, and the imaginary provide a comprehensive account of "magic" that could ultimately give rise to a new philosophical psychology. By focusing upon only one of these here—the imaginary—we see that through its irrealizing capabilities consciousness contaminates the world and bewitches itself in a manner that defies simple deterministic explication. We highlight this with an explication of what Sartre means by "nihilation" and the "analogon," and introduce a concrete example of nostalgia, hoping to lay the scene for a detailed study into the dynamic between our ontological freedom and its constitution and experience of phenomena as enchanting and bewitching. "Magical being" must therefore involve a deep, Sartrean analysis that explicates ontological freedom as becoming concretely engaged in both the real and irreal alike, whereby the imaginary as magic can lead to the most insane, as well as the most artistic, incantations.

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Daniel O'Shiel

By introducing 'drives' into a Sartrean framework, 'being-in-itself' is interpreted as 'Nature as such', wherein instincts dominate. Being-for-itself, on the contrary, has an ontological nature diametrically opposed to this former - indeed, in the latter realm, through a fundamental process of 'nihilation' (Sartre's 'freedom') consciousness perpetually flees itself by transcending towards the world. However, a kernel of (our) nihilated Nature is left at the heart of this process, in the form of 'original facticity' that we here name drives. Drives are the original feelings and urges of a freed Nature that simply are there; they are the fundamental forces that consciousness qua freedom always has to deal with. Drives, in addition, can be nihilated in their own turn, onto a reflective, irreal plane, whereby they take the form of value. This means Sartre's notion of ontological desire is always made up of two necessary components: drives and value.

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Clare Mac Cumhaill

is an original nihilation. Each element of the setting, a person, a table, a chair, attempts to isolate itself, to lift itself upon the ground constituted by the totality of other objects, only to fall back once more into the undifferentiation of this

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Matthew C. Eshleman

; first it is a nihilation of the world (since the world is not offering the imagined object as an actual object of perception)’ ( HB , 26). While the translated material in parentheses is true, it is not what Sartre means. Richmond's clarity shines

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Andrew Inkpin

consciousness – the nihilation of the in-itself that Sartre describes as ‘facticity’. 33 In this Sartrean optic, the very nature of consciousness is to be indifferent to the existence of everything beyond it (being-in-itself), in which respect ‘nihilation

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Disharmonious Continuity

Critiquing Presence with Sartre and Derrida

Gavin Rae

to say, show how each combats ontological presence, and is related to the other, we must bring them together through a close reading of these concepts. To do so, I first outline Sartre’s analyses of negativity, nothing, and nihilation in Being and

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Daniel O'Shiel

Sartre's own philosophy of nihilation (freedom) as the fundamental activity of consciousness, which neither simply negates nor completely annihilates being-in-itself, and thus one is perpetually ‘haunted’ by the latter through contingency, absurdity

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From Perception to Action

Sartre's Practical Phenomenology

Blake D. Scott

human beings, arguing instead that nihilation always presupposes an “originary” affirmation of being. 43 Consequently, Ricoeur objects to Sartre's view that the existential project can be conceived only in terms of negativity. Even in the extreme case

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Too Much of Nothing

Analytic and Sartrean Phenomenological Perspectives

John Graham Wilson

not. My discovery that Pierre is not in the café is revealed to me by a cumulative series of installments where each space, and customer, discloses itself as a not-Pierre. “Pierre raising himself as a nothingness, on the ground of the nihilation of

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Catrin Gibson

infant’s sense of Self is not gained through some Hegelian nihilation of the Other. The realisation of his separation is what allows him to have a relationship with her. In the next section, I argue that the unique ambiguous union that exists between