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Inge Manka

During the course of the 2006 Soccer World Cup, Germans started to celebrate a “new patriotism.” As the construction of national identity is inseparable in Germany from the Nazi past, this occurrence can be considered an indicator of an altered relationship to this past. This article examines these changes by focusing on a nationally recognized site of remembrance, the former Nazi Party Rally Grounds in Nuremberg, where five matches of the World Cup were played. The convergence of site and event evokes contradictions and ambiguities, such as the encounter of the opposed needs of sports and remembrance at the same location. It shows what problems arise at a site of national collective memory today, when the role of the national collective is challenged by developments like European integration, migration within and to Europe, and the on-going effects of globalization.

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Gretchen Schafft

Anthropologists who were also medical doctors often had a particularly active role in the Nazi regime, including the SS. One of these, Herbert Grohmann, studied under Eugen Fischer at Kaiser Wilhelm Institut of Anthropologie (KWIA) in Berlin from 1937 to 1938 and became his assistant. Grohmann, an SS officer, was sent to Poland as the head of public health in Lodz while maintaining his association with the KWIA. This article describes the interconnections of anthropology and public health in occupied Poland including the elimination (killing) of mentally ill patients, the implementation of the Deutsche Volksliste and the culling of 'racially fit' children for abduction to Germany. All of these activities are seen through the career of Herbert Grohmann.

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"Everyday Heroines"

Nazi Visions of Motherhood in Mutterliebe (1939) and Annelie (1941)

Jo Fox

National Socialism idealized maternal bravery, selflessness, devotion, and sacrifice as essential to the health of the nation, particularly in the context of World War II. This article critically assesses the Third Reich's projection of and women's reactions to the national cult of motherhood in Gustav Ucicky's Mutterliebe (Mother Love, 1939) and Josef von Baky's Annelie (1941). Though supported by a wide range of state-sponsored socio-economic initiatives and marketing strategies, these films reveal significant tensions between the ways women imagined themselves and the lives that the regime attempted to dictate for them. Because Nazi cinema also offered female viewers the opportunity to engage in escapist fantasies of adventure and romance, making dutiful motherhood appealing was always a challenge, and grew increasingly difficult as material hardships increased over the course of the war.

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“This Other Germany, the Dark One”

Post-Wall Memory Politics Surrounding the Neo-Nazi Riots in Rostock and Hoyerswerda

Esther Adaire

This paper examines antiforeigner violence in the former East German towns of Hoyerswerda (1991) and Rostock-Lichtenhagen (1992) as a case study for both the heightened presence of neo-Nazi/skinhead groups in Germany following 1989/in the Wende period, and the memory politics employed by German politicians in the Bundestag, as well as in media discourse, with regards to the problems entailed in uniting two Germanys which had experienced entirely difference processes of Vergangenheitsbewältigung. My analysis of the riots focuses mainly on the mnemonic discourses surrounding them, in particular the work that the image of “the East German skinhead” does within the broader context of German memory politics. This paper is also situated within the context of present-day German politics with regards to shifting cultures of memory and the electoral success of Alternative for Germany.

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Shylock and the Nazis

Continuation or Reinvention?

Alessandra Bassey

are important as it is widely assumed that Nazi art stands in artistic isolation, but in-depth comparative performance analysis suggests otherwise. In answering these questions, I hope to show that, especially in the case of Merchant , we should

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Susan Cohen

When the House of Commons met on 13 April 1933 to discuss Britain’s response to the new Nazi regime, of the twelve members of parliament who spoke during the lengthy debate, Eleanor Rathbone, Independent MP for the Combined English Universities, was

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“Hitlermania”

Nazism and the Holocaust in Indian History Textbooks

Basabi Khan Banerjee and Georg Stöber

or whether they consciously endorse genocide. Apart from the idolization of Hitler, Nazi ideology is linked to India via some of its key symbols and concepts, especially the swastika and the concept of Aryanism, both of which are important historical

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Ernst Leitz of Wetzlar and Helping the Persecuted

Scope of the Research and Some Reflections

Frank Dabba Smith

Weimar Republic, represented a public expression of Leitz's social values and underpinned the enduring mutual antagonism between him and the Nazi regime. Ernst Leitz II was an active supporter of the Weimar Republic and its parliamentary democratic form

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John Bendix

Paul Roland, Life in the Third Reich: Daily Life in Nazi Germany, 1933-1945 (London: Arcturus Publishing, 2015)

Eric Kurlander, Hitler’s Monsters: A supernatural history of the Third Reich (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017)

Shelley Baranowski, Armin Nolzen, and Claus-Christian W. Szejnmann, A Companion to Nazi Germany (Hoboken: Wiley, 2018)

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Samuel Salzborn

-standing antifeminism and hostility towards gender equality. Nevertheless, there has been somewhat less attention paid to the AfD’s handling of the Nazi past and its relationship to antisemitism. This might be because the party has avoided officially espousing anti