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Othello in Oman

Aḥmad al-Izkī’s Fusion of Shakespeare and Classical Arab Epic

Katherine Hennessey

All present gave a shout [in praise of her beauty], while the malicious and ill-natured cried aloud, ‘What a pity that one so beautiful and fair should be wedded to one so black!’ 1 Shakespeare opts not to stage the wedding of Othello and Desdemona

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Othello, Original Practices

A Photographic Essay

Rob Conkie

In October 2013 I directed an ‘original-ish practices’ staged reading of Othello . What follows is a photographic documentation of that event with occasional annotations. What did ‘original practices’ mean in this context (La Trobe University

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Deconstructing the Saussurean System of Signification

Miyagi Satoshi and His Mimetic Dramaturgy in Miyagi-Noh Othello

Tomoka Tsukamoto and Ted Motohashi

This article is an attempt to unravel the complicated relationship between actors’ words and their bodies in theatrical productions through a detailed examination of Miyagi Satoshi's remarkable staging of Shakespeare's Othello as well as of his

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‘Shakespeare Had the Passion of an Arab’

The Appropriation of Shakespeare in Fadia Faqir’s Willow Trees Don’t Weep

Hussein A. Alhawamdeh

This article traces William Shakespeare’s echo in Willow Trees Don’t Weep (2014) by Fadia Faqir, a Jordanian/British novelist, to examine the function of Faqir’s appropriation of Shakespeare’s Othello (1604) and Cymbeline (1611) in creating

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The Task of the Hebrew Translation

Reading into Othello’s Indian/Iudean Crux in the First Hebrew Translation

Eran Tzelgov

The 1870s mark the first translations of complete Shakespeare plays into Hebrew: Ithiel ha-Kushi mi-Vineẓya (Othello , 1874) and Ram ve-Yaʿel (Romeo and Juliet , 1878). These translations, by the Jewish convert to Christianity Isaac Edward

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Rowan Mackenzie

from historical and natural elements’. 9 This article explores the extent to which prison space is altered by the Shakespeare activities performed within it. The primary case study is an Othello session with a group of men in HMP Leicester. Consider

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Eran Shuali

); 6 the first book of John Milton’s Paradise Lost (1862); 7 Paradise Lost (full, 1870); 8 Shakespeare’s Othello (1874); 9 Christoph August Tiedge’s Urania (1876); 10 and Romeo and Juliet (1878). 11 From 1877, Salkinson was preparing a

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Shakespeare’s Orientalism Revisited

A Postcolonial Study of the Appropriation of Arabic/Islamic Allusions and Matters in the Bard’s Oeuvre

Mahmoud F. Al-Shetawi

(‘one tree’, ‘sole tree’) match: both connote the same meaning, a unique and far-fetched object that is characteristically Oriental. Again in Othello , Shakespeare uses the Arabian tree to associate his hero with the Orient: Othello's ‘subdu'd eyes

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Going Rogue

Bianca at Large

Elizabeth Mazzola

This article explores how Shakespeare transforms his early picture of female virtue embodied by Bianca Minola – safely stowed in her chambers in The Taming of the Shrew – into the freedom we find in Othello's Bianca, who is an emblem of the larger world; her movements aligned with integrity, the ability to reason, and mastery of her body. I investigate how Bianca's 'nomadic' status guarantees her safety and speech, and also locate her agency and mobility alongside the movements of female characters like Moll Cutpurse, Isabella Whitney's dejected maidservant, and Spenser's Britomart – all guardians of a world to which they only peripherally belong.

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The Nature of Gender

Are Juliet, Desdemona and Cordelia to their Fathers as Nature is to Culture?

Gordana Galić Kakkonen and Ana Penjak

This article brings ecofeminist critical thinking to William Shakespeare's female characters: Juliet in Romeo and Juliet, Desdemona in Othello, and Cordelia in King Lear. Beginning with the principal that women and nature are similar in many ways (reproductive function, discrimination, subordination, possession, violence), ecofeminism focuses on the interaction between the two. Ecofeminism grounds its beliefs in the fact that patriarchal domination gets imposed through different binary oppositions including man-woman and culture-nature categories. By applying ecofeminism's positions, the authors will provide a critical thinking of the production of socially imposed inequalities seen through Juliet, Desdemona, and Cordelia. Since out of many different publications on the topic of ecofeminism none has provided such an approach, the authors believe that the article presents an important addition to the literature on both Shakespeare and ecofeminism.