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Constructing Self, Constructing Others: Jewish-Israeli Perceptions of Palestinians and Germans

Tal Litvak-Hirsch, Dan Bar-On, and Julia Chaitin

This article explores issues of identity and "otherness" by looking at the construction of Jewish-Israeli identity among Jewish-Israeli young adults in relation to two main external others, Germans and Palestinians. Our main thesis is that the construction of Jewish-Israeli identity is connected to their perceptions of these two different external "others." This argument is discussed from both a theoretical and an empirical point of view. We suggest two modes of discourse that represent the ways in which German and Palestinian "others" are perceived in Jewish-Israeli society, and then demonstrate the interrelationship through examples from interviews conducted with Jewish-Israeli university students who participated in a seminar that touched on topics connected to the Holocaust past and the present Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

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The Palestinian Flag Is Back

Arab Soccer in a Jewish State Revisited

Tamir Sorek

Palestinian national spectacle. Fans waved Palestinian flags, and thousands of throats called simultaneously: “in blood, in spirit, we will redeem you al-Aqsa!” (the mosque in Jerusalem that has become an icon of Palestinian nationalism). In case anyone did

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The Palestinians, Israel, and BDS

Strategies and Struggles in Wars of Position

Ian S. Lustick and Nathaniel Shils

by the outcome of struggles among rivals within Palestinian and Israeli politics to gain prominence, resources, and influence relative to one another. As a shorthand, we will refer to these two explanations as “rationalist” and “political competition

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Public Silence and Latent Memories

Yitzhak Rabin and the Arab-Palestinian Citizens of Israel

Tamir Sorek

This article examines how Yitzhak Rabin is remembered by Palestinian citizens of Israel by juxtaposing analysis of references to him in the Arabic press in Israel with analysis of three surveys among Arab and Jewish citizens of Israel from November 1995 until July 2008. The findings suggest the existence of a latent nostalgia for Rabin's second term as prime minister (1992-1995) as a period when being Israeli looked like a realistic option for Palestinian citizens of Israel. Paradoxically, the image of Rabin among the Arab citizens of Israel moved in opposing directions in each of the two spheres of memory examined. At the public level, the extensive and mostly sympathetic attention given by some Arab political actors before 2000 was transformed into silence in the post-2000 period. The individual-based surveys, however, showed that Rabin's image remained salient and the sympathy felt for him even increased.

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Ben-Gurion and the Palestinian Refugees

Ideology, Morality, and Praxis

Yossi Goldstein

The trends in the literature on David Ben-Gurion's position on the 1948 Palestinian refugee problem can be divided into two main categories, with Benny Morris's (1987) The Birth of the Palestinian Refugee Problem marking a watershed between the

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Beyond Male Israeli Soldiers, Palestinian Women, Rape, and War

Israeli State Sexual Violence against Palestinians

Revital Madar

: “I spoke to Palestinian women, and they testified that there are no attacks of rape by Israeli soldiers. And that, again, is an interesting question we should address: Why do men not rape in conflicts or war? And if it doesn't happen, why doesn't it

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From Expert Rule to Bureaucratic Authority: Governing the Bedouin

Ceren Belge

This paper examines shifting modalities of government over Bedouins of the Negev. During the first two decades of statehood, Israeli officials approached Bedouins as a relatively quiescent population, based on their understanding that the Bedouins' tribal loyalties guaranteed their aloofness from Palestinian national politics. From the 1970s on, however, Bedouin resistance to Israeli land and settlement policies began to mark the Bedouin increasingly as a 'dangerous population'. As a result, the interest in preserving the Bedouins' cultural specificity gave way to a new emphasis on the need to modernize the Bedouins. The shift in governmental discourse was accompanied by a pluralization in the techniques of government, from an informal 'government of experts' to one in which bureaucratic and impersonal modes of authority competed with expert rule.

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Israel's Palestinian Minority

From 'Quietism' to Ethno-nationalism

Jonathan Mendilow

Hillel Cohen, The Rise and Fall of Arab Jerusalem: Palestinian Politics and the City since 1967 (New York: Routledge, 2011), 162 pp.

Oded Haklai, Palestinian Ethnonationalism in Israel (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011), 243 pp.

Amal Jamal, Arab Minority Nationalism in Israel: The Politics of Indigeneity (New York: Routledge, 2011), 324 pp.

Ilan Pappé, The Forgotten Palestinians: A History of the Palestinians in Israel (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2011), 336 pp.

Ilan Peleg and Dov Waxman, Israel’s Palestinians: The Conflict Within (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011), 262 pp.

Yitzhak Reiter, National Minority, Regional Majority: Palestinian Arabs versus Jews in Israel (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 2009), 403 pp.

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Using Op-ed Writing to Teach Israeli-Palestinian Relations

Lena Saleh and Mira Sucharov

Those of us who teach Israeli-Palestinian relations and the conflict know that it is not an easy task. Some instructors discourage students from voicing their political inclinations altogether. Others engage in a delicate balancing act between

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The Temple Mount/al-Aqsa in Zionist and Palestinian National Consciousness

A Comparative View

Hillel Cohen

The holy site known to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as Haram al-Sharif or al-Aqsa is central to both the Jewish and Palestinian Arab national movements. As such, it is important to plumb the roots of the role it plays for them, and to