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Underground Theater

Theorizing Mobility through Modern Subway Dramas

Sunny Stalter-Pace

This article begins from the premise that modern American drama provides a useful and understudied archive of representations of mobility. It focuses on plays set on the New York City subway, using the performance studies concept of “restored behavior” to understand the way that these plays repeat and heighten the experience of subway riding. Through their repetitions, they make visible the psychological consequences of ridership under the historical and cultural constraints of the interwar period. Elmer Rice's 1929 play The Subway is read as a particularly rich exploration of the consequences of female passenger's presumed passivity and sexualization in this era. The Subway and plays like it enable scholars of mobility to better understand the ways that theatrical texts intervene in cultural conversations about urban transportation.

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Field Notes and Reading Notes

Studying with Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett in the 1990s

Nélia Dias

entitled Performance Studies Issues and Methods . Unit III: Total Performance (H42.2617) at New York University's (NYU) Tisch School of the Arts in the 1990s ( Kirshenblatt-Gimblett and Buckland 1997 ). After attending Halloween events during the week of

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Stratfordian Perambulations; or, Walking with Shakespeare

Julie Sanders

There is much current interest in walking as a social and physiological practice in disciplines from literature to geography, from anthropology to performance studies. 'Walking Studies' impact Shakespearean scholarship and in particular work relating to Shakespeare-freighted sites such as Stratford-upon-Avon, where the loaded discourses of tourism and personal encounter are predominant in the practical experience of visitors. This article asks what it might mean, either for the individual or the collective, to 'walk with Shakespeare' and whether the 'Shakespeare' that we locate in these experiences is always already a construct, fashioned to feed the demands of a national economy and the gross national product by drawing millions of visitors to an otherwise fairly nondescript Midlands market town. It explores the possibility that walking with 'Shakespeare' may mean walking with an available icon but not with the complex textual, performative, and historical Shakespeares at the heart of academic scholarship.

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Editorial

Margaret Litvin

To my knowledge, this is the first essay collection in any language to be devoted to Arab appropriations of Shakespeare. Studies of international Shakespeare appropriation have mushroomed over the past fifteen to twenty years. Excitement began to build in the 1990s, as several lines of academic inquiry converged. Translation theorists found in Shakespeare’s plays a convenient (because widely known and prestigious) test case. Scholars in performance studies, having noted how sharply local context could influence a play’s staging and interpretation, saw a need to account for ‘intercultural’ performances of Shakespeare in various languages and locales. Marxist scholars became interested in the fetishisation of Shakespeare as a British cultural icon which, in turn, was used to confer cultural legitimacy on the project of capitalist empire-building. Scholars of postcolonial drama and literature explored how the periphery responded. The ‘new Europe’ provided another compelling set of examples. All this scholarship has developed quickly and with a great sense of urgency. Shakespeareans in many countries have contributed. By now there is a rich bibliography on Shakespeare appropriation in India, China, Japan, South Africa, Israel and many countries in Latin America and Eastern and Western Europe.

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Editorial

Conal McCarthy

has made an enormous contribution to several fields: museum studies, heritage studies, tourism, world's fairs, and many others. Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett is Professor Emerita of Performance Studies at Tisch School of the Arts, New York University

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Destination Museum

A Conversation with Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett

Conal McCarthy

, folklore, Jewish studies, performance studies, tourism and heritage—how have all these fields enriched your analysis of museums? All through primary and secondary school my favourite subject was home economics—that was the 1950s. It involved cooking, but

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Editorial

Peter Merriman

of scholars and practitioners working across the arts and humanities, whether in history, cultural and historical geography, literary and cultural studies, performance studies, archaeology, philosophy, film studies, or art and design. 2 Since its

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crushed little stars

A Praxis-in-Process of Black Girlhood

Jordan Ealey

alongside my own desire to honor my feelings, and this resulted in emotional confusion. After completing graduate courses in the theories, methods, and praxis of performance studies, I recognized the theoretical power of performance and its practical

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Editorial

Peter Merriman, Georgine Clarsen, and Gijs Mom

think across the fuzzy boundaries separating mobility studies, transport studies, mobility history, transport history, and media studies. We must also engage with approaches, methods, and debates from disciplines such as dance, performance studies

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Editorial

Liberating Curation

Dena Davida, Sandeep Bhagwati, Tawny Andersen, Victoria Carrasco, Barbara Scales, and Yves Sheriff

in the office, with our co-workers and the artists and audiences we serve. American performance studies scholar Benjamin Ross Nicolson delivers a tongue-in-cheek, and yet quite serious, manual for corporate (read “cultural”) workers. He urges us to