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Frances Steel

This special section on print culture, mobility, and the Pacific takes as its backdrop the new associations of sea travel with pleasure, leisure, and social distinction that gained traction from the 1920s, and that gradually diminished its

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Becoming “Pacific-Minded”

Australian Middlebrow Writers in the 1940s and the Mobility of Texts

Anna Johnston

’s first chairman was the publisher W. W. Norton, who had a personal and professional interest in Australian writing due to a brief visit during World War I. 6 Like other US servicemen stationed in the Pacific Islands during the “long middle years” of

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Worldly Tastes

Mobility and the Geographical Imaginaries of Interwar Australian Magazines

Victoria Kuttainen and Susann Liebich

were oriented toward Britain and Europe, but many of these trips took in areas of the Pacific that hugged Australia’s shores and extended into Southeast Asia. Australians also increasingly looked and traveled across the Pacific to America and beyond

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Ambivalent Mobilities in the Pacific

“Savagery” and “Civilization” in the Australian Interwar Imaginary

Nicholas Halter

Following World War I, the Pacific Islands became increasingly accessible to the average Australian with improvements in transportation and the growth of trade and business, Christian outreach, and colonial administration in the region

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Introduction

Print Culture, Mobility, and The Pacific, 1920–1950

Victoria Kuttainen and Susann Liebich

culture within paradigms of transatlantic (literary) mobility and exchange. 6 This special section extends this work to the Pacific, and the articles presented here draw principally on midrange print culture produced in Australia. We thus shift the focus

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Making Friends of the Nations

Australian Interwar Magazines and Middlebrow Orientalism in the Pacific

Victoria Kuttainen and Sarah Galletly

In Coast to Coast: Case Histories of Modern Pacific Crossings , Chris Dixon and Prue Ahrens argue that “[t]he Pacific, as Westerners understood it, was always more imagined than real, signifying a fantasy rather than an understanding of the region

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Democracy in the Pacific Islands

Comparable Practices, Contested Meanings

Jack Corbett

Ian Shapiro identifies three traditions of democratic thought: aggregative, deliberative, and minimalist. All three are apparent in the Pacific Islands despite most commentators and donors assuming that the meaning of democracy is fixed. The focus in development studies on institutions and their capacity to deliver pro-poor growth has generated a fourth tradition that revolves around the now pervasive governance concept. Rather than focusing on the general will of a sovereign people, this perspective is predominately concerned with the legitimate use of violence as a precursor to any development-orientated democratic state. Having reviewed the literature on democracy in the Pacific to parse out these four meanings, this article concludes that paying greater attention to this ideational equivocality would extend discussions about the suitability and transferability of this type of regime.

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Anthropocene Dynamics in the Prehistoric Pacific

Modeling Emergent Socioecological Outcomes of Environmental Change

Thomas P. Leppard

How will human societies evolve in the face of the massive changes humans themselves are driving in the earth systems? Currently, few data exist with which to address this question. I argue that archaeological datasets from islands provide useful models for understanding long-term socioecological responses to large-scale environmental change, by virtue of their longitudinal dimension and their relative insulation from broader biophysical systems. Reviewing how colonizing humans initiated biological and physical change in the insular Pacific, I show that varied adaptations to this dynamism caused diversification in social and subsistence systems. This diversification shows considerable path dependency related to the degree of heterogeneity/homogeneity in the distribution of food resources. This suggests that the extent to which the Anthropocene modifies agroeconomic land surfaces toward or away from patchiness will have profound sociopolitical implications.

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J.L. Black

In the debates surrounding the construction of the Trans-Siberian Railway, the transcontinental Canadian Pacific Railway was used as a model. This article traces how eyewitness accounts of Canadian settlement patterns were used by Russian entrepreneurs to argue the case for the financing and organisation of the Trans-Siberian Railway. Given the tense international political climate at the end of the 19th century, the Trans-Siberian also became a focus for imperial rivalry. This article gives a good overview of comparative colonial enterprise in two great continental colonies.

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Ocean, Motion, Emotion

Mobilities and Mobilizations in the Pacific

Matt Matsuda

conceptualizations, from Paul Gilroy’s “Black Atlantic,” to a seaborne African and Indian “Hundred Horizons” of Sugata Bose, to a Pacific “Sea of Islands” of Epeli Hau‘ofa, continue to reshape scholarly disciplines and popular discourses on the role of the seas in