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Suranjana Choudhury

Introduction The Partition of 1947 is one of the most defining moments of the history of the Indian subcontinent. Maps were redrawn along religious lines to displace millions on both sides of the border. People lost their homes, their loved ones

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Memory Practices in History Education about the 1947 British India Partition

Opportunities and Challenges to Breaching Hegemonic Remembering

Meenakshi Chhabra

This article is an epistemological reflection on memory practices in the construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction of collective memories of a historical event involving collective violence and conflict in formal and informal spaces of education. It focuses on the 1947 British India Partition of Punjab. The article engages with multiple memory practices of Partition carried out through personal narrative, interactions between Indian and Pakistani secondary school pupils, history textbook contents, and their enactment in the classroom by teachers. It sheds light on the complex dynamic between collective memory and history education about events of violent conflict, and explores opportunities for and challenges to intercepting hegemonic remembering of a violent past.

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Introduction

Overcoming the Quantity-Quality Divide in Economic Anthropology

Sandy Ross, Mario Schmidt, and Ville Koskinen

through set partitioning; and hysteresis, which draws attention to non-linear, delayed qualitative transitions between quantitative amounts or states. We explore the concreteness of numerical quantities and offer novel ways to consider how quantities have

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Malini Sur

In this review article, Sur reads across disciplines to join studies of partitions, borders, and mobility. Sur shows how two important partitions of the twentieth century that historically shaped South Asia's modern cartography continue to exert a shadow on everyday life and state violence at its longest boundary, the India-Bangladesh border.

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Regional integration from “below” in West Africa

A study of transboundary town-twinning of Idiroko (Nigeria) and Igolo (Benin)

Olukayode A. Faleye

dynamics from the experience of the partitioned people themselves using space as a unit of analysis. This work, therefore, provides a tangible examination of the bordering process and how it impacts on society overtime. Explaining transboundary town

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Israel Goes to the Polls

The Road to Elections for the Constituent Assembly, 1948–1949

Meir Chazan

creating, in the future, a united country, through the brotherhood of both peoples,” instead of “the abyss of partition” espoused by Mapai, which was putting off “the possibility of uniting the country.” A few days later, Mapam was already keeping silent

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Cailleachs, Keens and Queens

Reconfiguring Gender and Nationality in the poetry of Eileán Ní Chuilleanáin, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill and Eavan Boland

Helen Kidd

In Irish writing the house is a familiar metaphor for nation, psyche, and community. Haunted with unquiet ghosts, it is frequently depicted as symptom of colonial repression and control, invoking the Famine, dispossession, dislocation, partition; the list, as with all colonial abuses, goes on and on. Freud usefully makes the connection between the uncanny (unheimlich) and the homely (heimlich)2 indicating the secondary meaning of heimlich as covered, concealed. Once the silences and (long) sufferings of colonisation are out in the open, gender issues, and the institution of home supported by these, which also rests on naturalised cover-ups – these continue to unsettle the discourses of home, nation and history.

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Francisca de Haan

The year 2010 marked the centennial of International Women’s Day (IWD); the year 2011 marked the centennial of its first celebrations, which took place in Austria, Denmark, Germany, partitioned Poland, Switzerland, and no doubt other places. Inspired by these events, the theme section of this volume deals with “A Hundred Years of International Women’s Day in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe,” with articles focusing on Russia, the Polish lands, and Greece. In addition, we review the book Frauentag! (Women’s Day!), a collection of essays that accompanied an exhibition in Vienna on the occasion of IWD’s first centennial; and the News and Miscellanea section features a report on recent IWD-related events in Ukraine, including two exhibitions.

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Brian Bergen-Aurand

Screen Bodies 3.2 engages with a wide variety of topics—fat studies, contemporary queer cinema, (pre)posterity, puzzle films, grief and truth in filmmaking, feminist materialism, digitized bodies, food and horror, and Maghrebi cinema. As well, the selection of articles in this issue represents studies of several media—tv programs, films, publicity stills, and photographs—from a number of locations around the globe—North America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. What holds this general issue together, though, is a concern over expectation, assumption, and supposition: what we suppose screens and bodies do and what we suppose they do not do. As usual, with this journal, the focus of this consideration is doublehanded: screen as projection and screen as prohibition. The articles below explore the duality of screens and our responses to them. They engage screening expectation as showing, exposing, divulging, and, at the same time, as testing, partitioning, and withholding. To screen expectation is to reveal and conceal it, and, as these articles argue—each in their own way—this process is what we all engage in when we engage with screening.

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Creating borders in young minds

A case study of Indian and Pakistani school textbooks

Dhananjay Tripathi

of partition Textbooks are very powerful tools that are controlled by the state, and they can be used to promote ideas of friendliness, ethics, morality, and humanity. At the same time, they can stimulate passions and sometimes they project the