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(Mis)Leading the Reader

Decolonising Adventure Comics in Baruti and Cassiau-Haurie's Le Singe jaune

Alicia Lambert

readers and lead them to embrace alternative views on the common colonial history of the Congo and Belgium. Misleading the Reader: Another Quest in a Pays-décor ? Le Singe jaune 's title, cover, back cover, summary, and first pages may lead some

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What Feminism?

Alice A. Jardine

“What Feminism?” is an extended reflection upon several generations of readers of Simone de Beauvoir, including those readers the author herself has been, from the early 1960s to the present. Of particular interest are the serious readers of Beauvoir since her death in 1986, as opposed to the many detractors who have worked hard to tarnish Beauvoir's productive influence. Among the many groups of such serious readers there are, for example, the social theorist feminists such as Susan Buck Morss; the postcolonial/transnational feminist philosophers such as Chandra Mohanty; the poststructuralist-inspired feminist writers such as Teresa Brennan; and the queer/trans readers such as Judith Butler. What we learn from them is that, going forward, the important thing is to keep excavating the deep structures of Beauvoir's thought so as to forge new pathways for new generations to address the obviously gendered and more than sobering global crises of the twenty-first century.

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Something of a Girls Studies Reader?

Claudia Mitchell

Sometimes the evolution of an open call issue of Girlhood Studies results in something of a girls studies reader unto itself. Since this issue is packed full of criss-crossing themes based on work in several countries—Canada, Iceland, India and

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Evolution, Literature and Film: A Reader

Torben Grodal

Book Review of Brian Boyd, Joseph Carroll, and Jonathan Gottschall, eds. Evolution, Literature and Film: A Reader (New York: Columbia University Press, 2010)

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Electronic Editions and the Needs of Readers

John Lavagnino

Although very few electronic editions with any scholarly pretensions exist today, there is already a dominant idea of what an electronic edition ought to be. The idea is that an electronic edition ought to be an archive. It should offer diplomatic transcriptions of documents, and facsimiles of those documents. And it should avoid many of the things that scholarly editions have traditionally done, particularly the creation of critically-edited texts by means of editorial emendation. On this view, what readers need is access to original sources – to as many of them as possible, and avoiding as much as possible the shaping and selection that editors have traditionally engaged in. Although a lot of archives in the world were created and shaped to make specific points, this kind of archive-edition is not conceived of as doing that: it is instead imagined as a neutral witness.

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To “Lure On the Gentle Reader”

Approaching Historical Representations of Gender and Sexuality in the Arctic through Rockwell Kent's Salamina

Susan B. Vanek and Jette Rygaard

observer, Kent sought to “ lure on the gentle reader ,” 2 replicating representations of Indigenous women already common in American and European media at the time and still strikingly familiar today. Building on a sensationalism that has long been a

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Don Quixote Unbound

Intertextuality, Interpictoriality, and Transculturality in Flix's German Graphic Novel Adaptation (2012)

Tilmann Altenberg

Most of these are targeted at young readers, often with a clear pedagogical aim, as in the US series Classics Illustrated , 3 or the Spanish Joyas Literarias Juveniles [Literary gems for the young], whose Quixote s were translated and disseminated

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On Visual Coherence and Visual Excess

Writing, Diagrams, and Anthropological Form

Matei Candea

? Each of the previous diagrams had highlighted an intricate midpoint of thick comparison—could one imagine a midpoint of these midpoints? Without going into further detail at this point, a reader of Comparison in Anthropology will readily see that some

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Performance and Life Analogies in Shakespeare Novels for Young Readers

Marga Munkelt

The article uses performance and life analogies in ten novels for juvenile readers to investigate the young protagonists' quest for identity or orientation. Through their experiences in the theatre and as Shakespeare's colleagues, apprentices, or friends, the young people find out who they are and who they might be or should become. The narratives suggest that, not only as stage-actors but also as life-performers, they relive experiences that can be ascribed also to Shakespeare himself. As seen with their eyes, this Shakespeare is de-bardolatrised and de-mythologised when the life-and-theatre analogies he shares with them are extended to his working methods as a poet and playwright.

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The First Printed Books of Midrash and Their Jewish and Christian Readers

Benjamin Williams

Midrashim were first published as printed texts in the sixteenth century, initially in Sephardi communities of the Ottoman Empire and later at the famous Hebrew presses of Venice. Vital evidence about the study of these new books is furnished by a heavily annotated copy of Midrash Rabba (Venice, 1545) in the Bodleian Library. Handwritten marginal and interlinear notes show that it was studied by Jewish scholars of the Ottoman Empire and later by the celebrated orientalist and Church of England clergyman Edward Pococke. These glosses provide unique evidence of the interaction of a Christian scholar with the notes of an earlier Jewish reader in deciphering linguistic obscurities in the midrash and resolving textual errors. They therefore shed new light on how early printed books of midrash were read in the decades following their publication and on the study of rabbinic Bible interpretation in the early modern period.