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Tanja Carstensen

In the course of sociological research about the Internet, an accompanying range of new methodological approaches have been developed to investigate usage, communication, processes of appropriation, and the virtuality of the Internet. However, the exploration of the Internet as a technological and material object as well as the question of how it is involved in human practices are seen more rarely. This paper presents a methodology of software-based recording and an analysis of the interactions between humans and the Internet, which are visible on the screen. Adding methods of usability and market research to sociological Internet research, this enables us to “move closer” to the technology and to get a detailed view of human practices and Internet “actions” on the interface; therewith, it will be possible to investigate how social practices proceed when Internet technologies are involved, how users handle the Internet and to what extent it enables, facilitates, limits, or hinders practices.

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Introduction

Nonrecording states between legibility and looking away

Barak Kalir and Willem van Schendel

at effectively managing the entire population ( Lemke 2001 ). We recognize that the sweeping move toward carefully recording and watchfully “seeing” people is a crucial and constitutive element of state making. We also acknowledge that there is a

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Non- and dedocumenting citizens in Romania

Nonrecording as a civil boundary

Ioana Vrăbiescu

issue). More specifically, the state uses a strategy of dedocumenting and/or nonrecording people to render illegible certain segments of the population. 1 Two positions explain the state’s legibility as a manifestation of biopolitics in recording and

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Voices that Matter?

Methods for Historians Attending to the Voices of the Past

Josephine Hoegaerts

particularly, I will focus on those sounds emitted in modern Europe, before acoustic recording and replay technology became available. 9 I do so mainly because this is the context with which I am most familiar and from where I can draw my examples. 10 Even

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My Words, My Literacy

Tracking of and Teaching through the On-Field Language Practices of Australian Indigenous Boys

David Caldwell, Nayia Cominos, and Katie Gloede

utilized this technology to track the on-field language practices of sports people, nor is there research that specifically attempts to link these language recordings with issues of boys’ literacy practices. Wearable player tracking technology such as those

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“China gives and China takes”

African traders and the nondocumenting states

Shanshan Lan

Kalir and Willem van Schendel in this issue, state recording practices are oftentimes “strategic and selective rather than systemic and pervasive, episodic rather than continuous.” The temporary and selective nature of recording practices may leave ample

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The Representation of Childhood in Ethnographic Films of Siberian Indigenous Peoples

The Case of the Documentary Film Malen’kaia Katerina (Tiny Katerina)

Ivan Golovnev and Elena Golovneva

Translator : Jenanne Ferguson

various ethnic communities in Bali. Margaret Mead sought to harness the power of cinema for the goals of anthropology, using a film camera mainly as a means of recording material ( Gardner 2006: 10 ). It was believed that the main purpose of the field work

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“One Is Not Born a Dramatist”

The Genesis of Sartre’s Theatrical Career in Writings to, with, and by Beauvoir

Dennis A. Gilbert

information, namely writings to, with, and by Simone de Beauvoir. In this regard, I will look at the exchange of letters between Sartre and Beauvoir, her wartime diary, an article and a recording by Beauvoir from the 1940s in which she presents Sartre

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Raperas of the NeoRevolución

young women, capitalism and Cuban hip hop culture

Ardath Whynacht

This article explores female representation in mainstream hip hop culture in Cuba as a case study for analyzing how the presence of a commercial recording industry affects girls' participation as artists at the community level. The author raises questions about the role of a commercial recording industry, within a neoliberal political culture, in skewing youth culture from its underground roots, and about how young women navigate and resist such challenges in order to participate in hip hop culture.

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Museums in a Global World

A Conversation on Museums, Heritage, Nation, and Diversity in a Transnational Age

Conal McCarthy, Jennifer Walklate, Rhiannon Mason, Christopher Whitehead, Jakob Ingemann Parby, André Cicalo, Philipp Schorch, Leslie Witz, Pablo Alonso Gonzalez, Naomi Roux, Eva Ambos, and Ciraj Rassool

The following conversation took place during the Critical Heritage Studies conference in Gothenburg, Sweden, on 6 June 2012. The initial idea and topic was suggested by Kylie Message, the session was chaired by Conal McCarthy, and the recording was transcribed by Jennifer Walklate and edited by Conal McCarthy and Jennifer Walklate.