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Jo Lindsay

Contemporary undergraduate courses in research methods are challenging to teach because of the wide scope of the subject matter, limited student contact hours and the complexity of supervising research projects undertaken by novices. Focus group assignments within class offer an interesting and enjoyable way for students to develop and apply research skills and reflect on the process of being both a researcher and a research participant in social science disciplines. Using focus groups enables deep learning, formative assessment and the development of reflexive research skills. This article discusses the use of focus group assignments as a key assessment tool in a Sociological research methods course taught at Monash University, Australia. The use of focus groups as a teaching tool is further assessed through analysing the reflections and evaluations given by students participating in the course.

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Visible on Our Own Terms

Evoking Girlhood Self-Images Through Photographic Self-Study

Rosalind Hampton and Rachel Desjourdy

Photographic self-study can promote professional growth and deepen analysis of how girlhood experiences such as those related to ability, class, gender, and race are conditioned by and inform our multiple, shifting identities as women. This article presents excerpts from three women's experiences of photographic self-study, highlighting the possibilities of this method as a malleable, feminist approach to critical reflexive practice. Our stories demonstrate how a creative process of self-interpretation, self-representation, and self-knowing can draw oppressive categories of self-identification-carried from girlhood-to the surface and expose them to critique and deconstruction.

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Debarati Sen and Sarasij Majumder

The global circulation of food and agricultural commodities is increasingly influenced by the ethical choices of Western consumers and activists who want to see a socially and environmentally sustainable trade regime in place. These desires have culminated in the formation of an elaborate system of rules, which govern the physical and social conditions of food production and circulation, reflected in transnational ethical regimes such as fair trade. Fair trade operates through certifying producer communities with sustainable production methods and socially just production relationships. By examining interdisciplinary academic engagements with fair trade, we argue that fair trade certification is a transnational bio-political regime; although, it holds the potential for reflecting global counterpolitics. By reviewing the literature on the emergence and history of fair trade certification, agro-food chains, case studies on certified producer communities and the certification process, this article shows that fair trade certification is a new governing mechanism to discipline farmers and producers in the Global South by drawing them into globalized market relationships. However, recent studies suggest that fair trade also leaves open the potential for creative iterations of the fair trade idea in producer communities to give voice to their situated struggles for justice. Thus, fair trade constitutes a contested moral terrain that mediates between the visions of justice harbored by producers and activists in the Global South and reflexive practices of the Western consumers. To map these critical developments around fair trade and fair trade certification, close ethnographic attention to the material and symbolic life of certification is vital.

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Way to Go

The Significance of Place for Girls and Girlhood Studies

Eva Hoffmann

girls” (7). In the second section, “Situated Knowledge, Self-Reflexive Practice,” the focus is on how girlhood studies scholars make use of different self-reflexive practices in their research, which is, as the editors point out, one of the “defining

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‘Is Anthropology Legal?’

Anthropology and the EU General Data Protection Regulation

Cassandra Yuill

approval to do so, even if this framework is ill-fitted for ethnographic projects. There is often tension between the phenomenological nature of anthropological research and unbending ethics procedures, which may not identify the extent to which reflexive

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Assessing Ritual Experience in Contemporary Spiritualities

The Practice of ‘sharing’ in a New Age Variant of Umbanda

Viola Teisenhoffer

.g., Fedele 2014 ; Houseman et al. 2016 ; Lindquist 1997 ; Luhrmann 1989 ; Sutcliffe 2003 ), this reflexive practice is not necessarily formalized or explicitly presented as a ritual sequence in itself. While it may imply prescribed elements—such as

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Now You See Me, Now You Don’t

Medical Design Anthropology, Improvisational Practices and Future Imaginings

Jonathan Ventura and Wendy Gunn

reflexive process, allowing for them to go over their project after its culmination and to learn from their mistakes. As an inherent part of its practice, medical design anthropology can instigate both reflection and reflexive practice(s) as an integral part

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Jeff Kirby

also possible in response to sustained reflexive practices by social movements (2003: 55). 4 For simplicity I will not further divide cultural capital into three subgroups or states (embodied, objectified, and institutional), as Bourdieu (1984) has

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Bringing the state back in

Corporate social responsibility and the paradoxes of Norwegian state capitalism in the international energy sector

Ståle Knudsen, Dinah Rajak, Siri Lange, and Isabelle Hugøy

, privatization, new public management (NPM), audit culture, and the like. Foucault's exploration of neoliberalism in his 1978–79 lectures at the Collège de France has inspired approaches to neoliberalism that stress how the reflexive practice of governance