Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,099 items for :

  • "Resistance" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Adopting a Resistance Lens

An Exploration of Power and Legitimacy in Transitional Justice

Julie Bernath and Sandra Rubli

; Sriram 2012 ). However, while power and legitimacy have gained significant attention, the concept of “resistance” has not been comprehensively addressed. For transitional justice scholars, resistance is often simply associated with actors who show a lack

Restricted access

Archival Resistance

Reading the New Right

Annika Orich

acts of resistance. Though the debate about the exact nature of archives is lively and ongoing, 10 there is widespread consensus about certain functions that archives assume. In her excellent overview of archival discourses, Marlene Manoff explains

Restricted access

Transnational Cultural Propaganda

French Cultural Policies in Britain during the Second World War

Charlotte Faucher

The Second World War challenged the well-established circulation of cultural practices between France and Britain. But it also gave individuals, communities, states, and aspiring governments opportunities to invent new forms of international cultural promotion that straddled the national boundaries that the war had disrupted. Although London became the capital city of the main external Resistance movement Free France, the latter struggled to establish its cultural agenda in Britain, owing, on the one hand, to the British Council’s control over French cultural policies and, on the other hand, to the activities of anti-Gaullist Resistance fighters based in London who ascribed different purposes to French arts. While the British Council and a few French individuals worked towards prolonging French cultural policies that had been in place since the interwar period, Free French promoted rather conservative and traditional images of France so as to reclaim French culture in the name of the Resistance.

Restricted access

Analyzing Resistance to Transitional Justice

What Can We Learn from Hybridity?

Briony Jones

convincingly argued elsewhere (see, e.g., McEvoy and McGregor 2008 ), and the purpose of this article is not to rehearse such arguments but instead to take them as entry points into an underexplored aspect of these tensions: resistance. While much of the

Restricted access

Virile Resistance and Servile Collaboration

Interrupting the Gendered Representation of Betrayal in Resistance Movements

Maša Mrovlje

Women have long been perceived as intrinsically treacherous, placed in the position of a constitutive other of fraternal solidarity ( Boryzcka 2012 ; Bow 2001 ; Yuval-Davis 1993 ). Resistance movements are no exception. While hegemonic

Free access

Gramsci in and beyond resistances

The search for an autonomous political initiative among a subaltern group in the Beninese savanna

Riccardo Ciavolella

In recent decades, “resistance” has emerged as a crucial notion in critical theory debates on social movements and the transformative potential of popular politics. Slavoj Žižek (2007) has unfavorably remarked that contemporary post-Marxist and

Restricted access

The Return of N'Guyen Van Binh

Exile and Injustice in the French Empire, 1866–1876

Geoff Read

Mahdi of the North West’: Louis Riel and the Métis Resistance in Trans-Atlantic and Imperial Context,” Canadian Historical Review 93 (June 2012): 171–195. 6 There is a large and growing literature on the violence of the French Empire. For three key

Restricted access

Between Resistance and the State

Caribbean Activism and the Invention of a National Memory of Slavery in France

Itay Lotem

resistance within the context of twenty-first-century republicanism. This particular case illustrates the way new anti-racist groups mobilized the memory of slavery to articulate a new kind of black identity in France. This article therefore complements the

Restricted access

Demonstrating resistance

Politics and participation in the marches of the Mothers of Plaza de Mayo

Victoria Ana Goddardl

This article explores ways in which the Mothers of Plaza de Mayo confronted the state on the violence perpetrated during Argentina's "dirty war" during the 1970s and early 1980s. Focusing particularly on the Marches of Resistance initiated during the last years of the military regime in 1981, the article argues that their resistance had an important effect on political culture, encouraging participation and innovative forms of political action. At the same time, shifts in political conditions also caused internal changes in the Mothers' movement. A discussion of the circumstances that resulted in a schism within the movement and current divergences in conducting the marches leads to reflections on different interpretations of the political.

Free access

Maša Mrovlje and Jennet Kirkpatrick

‘For a revolutionary work is not one that glorifies victories and conquests, but one that brings to light the Revolution's most painful conflicts’. – Albert Camus, Lyrical and Critical Essays Of late, resistance has become a central notion