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Serpil Atamaz-Hazar

This article discusses the historical value of Ottoman women’s periodicals published in the aftermath of the 1908 Revolution, which marked the beginning of the Constitutional Era (1908–1918). Through specific examples of women’s writings in the press, it illustrates how these periodicals can shed light on the previously unexplored aspects of this period. The article argues that women’s journals allow scholars both to recover the identities and stories of hundreds of women, which would have been lost otherwise, and to challenge the mainstream historiography, which has traditionally presented a one-dimensional portrayal of the Constitutional Era by privileging men’s voices and experiences over women’s. It demonstrates that women’s journals not only reveal a dynamic, flexible, and complex milieu, in which women could and did act as agents of both social and political change, but also signify the multifaceted transformation the Revolution of 1908 caused in Ottoman society in the early twentieth century.

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L’Istanbul du début du XXe siècle au prisme eurocentrique

L’urbanisme et la Civilisation selon Ebüzziya Tevfik (1849–1913)

Özgür Türesay

This article examines an eminent Ottoman journalist's writings on urbanism. Ebüzziya Tevfik, a polyvalent intellectual of the late Ottoman Empire, was a pioneer in the field of printing and was also known as a prolific writer. In the aftermath of the Young Turk Revolution of 1908, he penned some 26 articles on urbanism. This corpus reflects Ebüzziya Tevfik's perception of urbanism as a question of civilisation.

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Wang Zhen, Alfred Tovias, Peter Bergamin, Menachem Klein, Tally Kritzman-Amir, and Pnina Peri

Palestinians. Chapters 3 to 5 deal with the first Zionist immigration wave, while chapter 6 is about Herzl and the establishment of political Zionism. Chapter 7 deals with the second wave of Zionist immigration and the impact of the Young Turk Revolution of

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Pınar Melis Yelsalı Parmaksız

. The CUP seized state power in the constitutional revolution of 1908. During Ikinci Meşrutiyet (the Second Constitutional Era, 1908–1920), especially after 1919, the CUP implemented social and cultural reforms in line with westernization efforts while