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Higher education and entrepreneurial citizenship in Singapore

Søren Christensen

Focusing on Singapore's 'Global Schoolhouse' project, this article discusses how efforts to transform Singapore into a 'world class' knowledge economy entail changes to the status of citizenship in Singapore. The project of wooing top foreign universities to Singapore is permeated with an entrepreneurial ideal of Singapore as the 'Boston of the East'. Since Singaporeans tend to be viewed by the Singapore government as particularly risk averse compared to Westerners and other Asians, the government has increasingly relied on 'foreign talent' to provide entrepreneurial dynamism to Singapore. The expansion of high-quality university education in Singapore serves as a vehicle of this 'foreign talent' policy as much as it accommodates the needs of local students for higher education. The ensuing questions about citizenship in Singapore's knowledge economy are finally discussed in terms of a differentiated 'entrepreneurial citizenship'.

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Controlling Nature, Disciplining Human Nature: Floods in Singapore and Metro Manila, 1945–1980s

Kah Seng Loh and Michael D. Pante

A history of urban floods underlines the state's efforts to discipline people as well as to control floodwaters. We focus on two big cities in Southeast Asia—Singapore and Metro Manila—in the period from after World War II until the 1980s. During this period, both cities traversed similar paths of demographic and socioeconomic change that had an adverse impact on the incidence of flooding. Official responses to floods in Singapore and Manila, too, shared the common pursuit of two objectives. The first was to tame nature by reducing the risk of flooding through drainage and other technical measures, as implemented by a modern bureaucracy. The second was to discipline human nature by eradicating “bad” attitudes and habits deemed to contribute to flooding, while nurturing behavior considered civic-minded and socially responsible. While Singapore's technocratic responses were more effective overall than those in Metro Manila, the return of floodwaters to Orchard Road in recent years has highlighted the shortcomings of high modernist responses to environmental hazards. This article argues that in controlling floods—that is, when nature is deemed hazardous—the state needs to accommodate sources of authority and expertise other than its own.

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A megastructure in Singapore

The “Asian city of tomorrow?”

Xinyu Guan

Built in the 1970s as a prototype for a new Asian model of urbanism, the 31-story People's Park Complex (PPC) towers above the surrounding two-story shop houses of the old city center of Singapore. The building features a series of large

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Beyond the Discourse of Sexualization

An Inquiry into the Adultification of Tween Girls’ Dressing in Singapore

Bernice Loh

implications of the adultification of tween girls’ dressing in Singapore. This is despite the fact that Singapore is one of the most westernised countries in the region, and despite an increasing number of reports in local mainstream media that highlight that

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LIVE Singapore! The Urban Data Collider

Carlo Ratti and Matthew Claudel

The world is urbanizing at an unprecedented rate, and its cities are transformed by technology and distributed computing. With every photograph, Twitter post, public transit ride, and credit card swipe, we leave digital traces in physical space. The enormous quantity of information, or Urban Big Data, that humanity generates each day is beginning to off er new possibilities for research, design, and systems optimization on the city scale, but the first step toward our urban future is finding new ways of understanding and visualizing Big Data—revealing invisible dimensions of the city.

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Out of Sight, Out of Mind

The Invisible Society of Waste in Singapore

Ng Xin Hui, Kuan Shu Wen, and Md Saidul Islam

studying the problem of domestic waste beyond attributing it to individual motivations and policies, this article, taking Singapore as an empirical case, addresses a critical issue: whether and how the obscurement of waste promotes the production of waste

Open access

Studying Gender While ‘Studying Up’

On Ethnography and Epistemological Hegemony

Samantha Breslin

When I first introduced my research on gender and the ‘making’ of computer scientists in Singapore to one of the computer science classes where I would be conducting participant observations, the professor interjected and asked if I was looking to

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Loh Kah Seng. 2013. Squatters into citizens. The 1961 Bukit Ho Swee Fire and the making of modern Singapore. Singapore: NUS Press. 315 pp. Pb.: €26.60. ISBN‐13: 978‐0‐8248‐3946‐8.

Barbara Götsch

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The Developmental State in Ecological Modernization and the Politics of Environmental Framings: The Case of Singapore and Implications for East Asia

Catherine Mei Ling Wong

In East Asia, climate change as a policy concern has been a late developer. The last decade, however, has seen the mainstreaming of environmental issues in core policy circles, but in the form of market-friendly, pro-industrial development framings. This paper problematizes such environmental framings by looking at the politics of state-led ecological modernization and the institutional reforms that have emerged out of it. It argues that State-led ecological modernization necessarily leads to environmental framings that are too narrowly defined by state and industrial interests - hence the focus on carbon emissions, energy security and the impact on Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The State-driven assumption that society can modernize itself out of its environmental crisis through greater advancements in technological development also ignores the fact that this process often leads to the creation of other environmental and social problems, which in turn undermines the fundamental goals of stability and sustainability. Civil society needs to be given greater space in the policy and framing processes in order to have a more balanced policy approach to environmental reform in a more equitable way.

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Altered Landscapes and Filmic Environments

An Account from the 13th Asian Cinema Studies Society Conference

Tito R. Quiling Jr.

It's just past 10:00 am on a humid Monday in Singapore, and the streets seemed to have settled after a workday rush. 1 My walk from Arab Street to McNally Street was rather placid, punctuated by moments at intersections, and surrounded by people