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The Cultural Divide

Book Reading as a Signifier of Boundaries among Co-Cultures in Israeli Society

Hanna Adoni and Hillel Nossek

This article investigates the function of book reading in a society consisting of a multiplicity of ethno-cultural communities, asking whether book reading functions as a unifying factor within each ethno-cultural community or as a dividing factor and as a signifier of boundaries between them. It is based on multiyear survey data among representative samples of Israeli urban adults (1970, 1990, 2001-2002, 2007, and 2011), focus groups, and analysis of bestseller lists (2001, 2002). The article demonstrates that book reading functions as a signifier of boundaries within Israeli society, namely between ethno-cultural co-cultures of veteran Jewish Israelis, Jewish immigrants from the former Soviet Union, and Israeli Arabs. This supports Morley and Robins's claim that cultural consumption may be a divisive factor between the co-cultures within nation-states.

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Rapping French Cities in the 1990s

Blurring Marseille and Brightening Paris in Contested Processes of Boundary Making

Joseph Downing

Scholarship on rap has emphasized the propensity of rap to form and reinforce social boundaries. This is particularly the case in studies that focus on rap's relationship to regions, cities, and neighborhoods. 1 The dominant trend has been for

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Moral Thresholds of Outrage

The March for Hrant Dink and New Ways of Mobilization in Turkey

Lorenzo D’Orsi

loyalties—calls into question often elusive symbolic and social boundaries between groups and individuals. Boundaries arise from social interactions, are historically sedimented in memories and bodies, and are continuously made and unmade by subjects. As

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Fiona Cullen

Much previous scholarly work has noted the gendered nature of humor and the notion that women use comedy in a different way than do their male peers. Drawing on prior work on gender and humor, and my ethnographic work on teen girl cultures, I explore in this article how young women utilize popular cultural texts as well as everyday and staged comedy as part of a gendered resource that provides potential sites for sex-gender transgression and conformity. Through a series of vignettes, I explore how girls do funny and provide a backdrop to perform youthful gendered identities, as well as establish, maintain, and transgress cultural and social boundaries. Moving on to explore young women and stand-up I question the potential in mobilizing humor as an educational resource and a site in which to explore sex-gender norms with young people.

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Boundaries and Margins

The Making of the ‘Golden Cage’

Eirini Chrysocheri

Abstract

This article focuses on the Greek community of Alexandria, a socially and territorially bounded Diaspora entity that articulates a sense of connection to place through claims of a historically continuous socio-spatial connection to both Egypt and Greece. Through analyses of visual material collected and produced during fieldwork, I explore the spatial and social boundaries of the community before and after Nasser's 1952 revolution and highlight discontinuities in the narratives and imaginings of the city articulated by different generations. Studying the creation of new borders, I reveal how restriction to, and isolation within, the ‘golden cage’ of Greek areas is both willingly embraced and a source of frustration. I conclude by outlining how spatial and ideological boundaries overlap and how they are shifted and defended by Greek and non-Greek inhabitants of the city.

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From 'The Purest Literature We Have' to 'A Spirit Grown Corrupt'

Embracing Contamination in Twentieth-Century Crime Fiction

Gill Plain

In Powers of Horror (1982), Julia Kristeva suggests that the corpse is ‘the utmost in abjection. It is death infecting life’. This categorical statement, while not intended for the genre of crime fiction, nonetheless does much to explain the power and appeal of the twentieth century’s most successful fictional formula. For Kristeva, the abject is ‘the in-between, the ambiguous, the composite’ (4); it is experienced as an encounter with ‘an other who precedes and possesses me’ (10) and it is ‘a border that has encroached upon everything’ (3). Borders both defend and confine. They are the necessary limits that protect the subject from psychosis, and they are that which deny us our desired return to a lost imaginary plenitude. Kristeva’s abject evokes seepage, it speaks to the instability of borders, and the impossibility of the pristine, the firm, the uncontaminated. And it is just this sense of unavoidable defilement, this tension between the maintenance and collapse of cultural and social boundaries, that underpins both the crime genre and our fascination with the form.

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Introduction

Visual Anthropology in the Middle East

Esther Hertzog and Yael Katzir

argues socio-political changes in Egypt have been projected on the image of the dancer and have simultaneously changed it. Chrysocheri's article also relates to historical and social background connected to Egypt. It analyses the spatial and social

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Thomas Hylland Eriksen

major religions. Notwithstanding the contrast between cultural tolerance and social boundary maintenance, the scalar gap between cosmopolitan ideals and group-based practices needs to be examined briefly. The example of interethnic marriages (known in

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Attitude or Age

Girlhood in Renaissance England

Reina Green

resistance to social and sexual boundaries. In chapter two, Higginbotham continues her examination of female characters in late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century drama, looking at those who resist such social boundaries. Girlhood was a space of greater

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Bryonny Goodwin-Hawkins

registry offices ( Yuval-Davis et al. 2019 ); dismantled hard borders re-appear in heightened social boundaries ( Donnan 2010 ). Borders, the turn illustrates, are not simply ‘phenomena located at the ‘edges’ of territories but rather ‘all over’ territories