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Konrad H. Jarausch

Perhaps two generations after the modest beginning, the FRG's successes and failures have become amenable to a more balanced evaluation. From the vantage point of the "Berlin Republic," the key question has shifted from whether the second German democracy would survive at all, to the reasons for its relatively positive course and to the extent of its lingering problems. This chapter first delves into the emergence of popular myths that characterized the Federal Republic's difficult search for identity. Secondly, it takes a look at some of the West's actual accomplishments in problem-solving, because such a comparison helps explain the eventual collapse of the East. Finally, it scrutinizes several of the competing explanations so as to reveal their political agendas and discuss their analytical limitations. Instead of presenting a simple success story, this reflection therefore strives for a critical appreciation. The paper concludes that at sixty, the FRG has entered a comfortable middle age, leaving be hind some of its earlier drama, but exuding a sense of competent normalcy. The mythical challenges of postwar reconstruction and recovery of international respectability have receded, followed instead by everyday concerns that are much less exhilarating. There are still plenty of problems, ranging from an aging population to a lack of full-day childcare, but they are shared by other advanced industrial societies. Moreover, after a century of first arrogant and then dejected difference, the German Sonderweg has finally come to an end. As a result of the meltdown of the Anglo-American version of unrestrained capitalism, the German model of a socially responsive market economy has even regained some of its prior luster. Hence, the postwar record of cautious incrementalism inspires some confidence that the Germans will also manage to meet the unforeseen political and economic challenges of the future.

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Erik Gawel, Sebastian Strunz, and Paul Lehmann

The German energy transition repeatedly faces harsh critiques questioning its economic and environmental merits. This article defends the energy transition and argues that Germany has chosen an economically efficient and particularly forceful approach to securing a sustainable energy supply. Though current expenditures are high, the long-term benefits of transforming the energy system to a renewables-based system are likely to outweigh present investment costs. Furthermore, support policies for renewables are not redundant-as some critics claim-but instead complement other policy instruments, such as the emissions trading scheme. This article also addresses the motives behind the discrediting attacks on the German energy policy regime. Defensive actions by beneficiaries of the former energy market structure are only to be expected, but the attacks from liberal economists are astonishingly fierce.

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Dhiraj Murthy, Twitter: Social Communication in the Twitter Age Casey Brienza

Ole B. Jensen, Staging Mobilities Fiona Ferbrache

Aharon Kellerman, Daily Spatial Mobility: Physical and Virtual Simona Isabella

Peter Merriman, Mobility, Space and Culture Thomas Birtchnell

Guillermo Giucci, The Cultural Life of the Automobile: Roads to Modernity Georgine Clarsen

Frank Steinbeck, Das Motorrad. Ein deutscher Sonderweg in die automobile Gesellschaft Christopher Neumaier

Maarten Smaal, Politieke strijd om de prijs van de automobiliteit. De geschiedenis van een langdurend discours: 1895–2010 Hans Jeekel

Annette Vowinckel, Flugzeugentführungen. Eine Kulturgeschichte Christian Kehrt

Philip D. Morgan, Maritime Slavery Paul Barrett

Neil Archer, The French Road Movie: Space, Mobility, Identity Michael Gott

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Jonathan Bach, Heather L. Dichter, Kirkland Alexander Fulk, Alexander Wochnik, Wilko Graf von Hardenberg, and Carol Hager

wasting tax dollars on dubious sport science research which yielded no results. In what could be considered a somewhat controversial aspect of the book, the authors hint at a German sport Sonderweg (special path) in the postwar period, particularly

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From “De Facto King” to Peasants’ Communes

A Struggle for Representation in the Discourse of the Polish Great Emigration, 1832–1846/48

Piotr Kuligowski

events was the elaboration of a vision of the Polish Sonderweg , 87 encompassing specific ideas about the Polish nation as representing true, proper values of rural, Slavonic life. Finally, the radicals also experienced rapid changes after 1846. After a

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Herr or Hüter of the Constitution?

The First Fifty Years in the History of the German Federal Constitutional Court

Manfred H. Wiegandt

the Court’s strong interference with and hampering of European integration is concerned, it almost seems to the author that in its history the Court has gone one step forward by correcting Germany’s prewar special path ( Sonderweg ), only to go one

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Joyce Marie Mushaben, Shelley Baranowski, Trevor J. Allen, Sabine von Mering, Stephen Milder, Volker Prott, and Peter C. Pfeiffer

dictatorship. In the tradition of the Sonderweg (“special path”) thesis, Winkler argues that Germany was plagued by a “lopsided process of democratization” (421), by which rapid economic modernization and expansion of voting rights had not been “properly

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Eugenia Gay, Philipp Nielsen, Emanuel Richter, and Gregor Feindt

or fail to achieve full parliamentarism. Even the German Sonderweg makes a reappearance, only this time it is Austria instead of Prussia that fails to “catch up” (67). And considering that the editors set up parliamentary developments in Europe as a

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Beverly Crawford Ames and Armon Rezai

“empire,” of pursuing a new Sonderweg , of “going global alone,” of evasiveness, self-imposed isolation, and bullying. The U.S. Treasury and the International Monetary Fund ( imf ) have accused Germany of pursuing “beggar-my-neighbor” policies with its

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Renaissance of the New Right in Germany?

A Discussion of New Right Elements in German Right-wing Extremism Today

Samuel Salzborn

diplomacy and the creation of peace without weapons, an existence hemmed in by friends, economy as destiny, the welfare state as a matter of course, immigration as an asset, consumerism as a sedative, Auschwitz as a founding myth, the Sonderweg [Germany