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Adrian Van Den Hoven

This article analyzes articles and interviews published in Sartre on Theater and focuses on five plays (Bariona, The Flies, No Exit and The Condemned of Altona) in order to arrive at a coherent conception of Sartre's theater. Sartre views the stage as “belonging to a different imaginary realm“ in which the characters' language, gestures and the props function in a synecdochical relationship in respect to the spectators. It is their task to grasp these “signs“ and bundle them into a coherent and meaningful whole. Because Sartre views the theater as an imaginary realm, he can free himself from the strictures of his philosophy: 1) the irreversibility of time; 2) the fact that life does not give us a second chance; and 3) that death means that our life falls into the public domain. This freedom allows Sartre to deal with temporality in a novel way and to deal with “life after death“ as life simply continued. Conversely, he can scramble temporality for psychological reasons in order to bring out deep rooted personal conflicts, as he does in The Condemned of Altona.

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Language Hierarchies

Visualizing Linguistic Space in Modern Travel Writing

Anjali Pandey

This article focuses on the travelogue of the twentieth century. Deftly using the spaces of city/country to situate language and people Miranda France, in Bad Times in Buenos Aires: A Writer's Adventures in Argen tina (1999), presents a hierarchy of linguistic value and poignancy of place by semantically conflating English, Spanish, and indigenous Latin American languages with a different spatial positioning relative to the Other in the bustle of Buenos Aires. The consequence is the building of a hierarchical edifice—which metaphorically as it literally centers English, and places its speakers atop the city— situates Spanish and its speakers at a street level; and relegates indigenous peoples to the lowest metropolitan reaches—unseen and underground—marginalized to the periphery of her literary geoscape. This conflation of linguistic code with the synecdoche of space introduces another way in which to examine the politics of travel writing in a globally connected, multilingual world.

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Perspective Games

Cham's Heritage and Legacy

Philippe Willems

This article draws attention to the transition in print culture that took place between the 1830s and the 1850s, allowing for a new flexibility in format and new relations between word and image. Within this wider context, Cham was an innovator who adapted literary techniques such as mise en abyme, oxymoron and synecdoche to visual storytelling. The article focuses on links between Cham's work and Tristram Shandy: I show how Cham introduces Sterne's reflexivity into his comic strips, using unorthodox framing and inserting blind panels as a deliberate interference in transmission, impeding the reader's privileged point of view. Cham deploys a number of parodic devices to demystify canonical texts: for example, in an incursion across diegetic boundaries, he kills off characters from Victor Hugo's Les Misérables with a few well-aimed swipes from a vast pen.

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Fire Escapes to Nowhere

Colin and Cilluffo's World Trade Angels

Lawrence R. Schehr

Colin and Cilluffo's graphic novel, World Trade Angels, is an illustration of the creation, through language and image, of a new vocabulary and a new imaginaire, after the events of 11 September 2001. No previously existing language is adequate; the authors introduce a new verbal, temporal, and pictorial vocabulary to try to represent the unrepresentable of that day. Significantly, in this work, divisions, grills, grates, bars and squares all multiply until the representation of the entire city is seen as a reproduction of the façade of the towers and a reflection of that façade that no longer exists. And as a synecdoche of that grillwork that quickly becomes a penetrable portcullis or an inescapable set of prison bars, the authors introduce the leit-motiv of a fire escape, but one that leads not to safety but to perdition and repetition. It is this set of figures I explore in this article.

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Jeffrey M. Zacks, Trevor Ponech, Jane Stadler, and Malcolm Turvey

Gil were here so I could pose my questions to him directly. First, it often seemed to me that Gil struggles to fit rhetorical categories such as metaphor, metonymy, and synecdoche to film. Of course, part of the problem is that there is much debate

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Jens Eder

Deserto Rosso; Michelangelo Antonioni, 1964), Taxi Driver (Martin Scorsese, 1976), Fight Club (David Fincher, 1999), Adaptation (Spike Jonze, 2002), Synecdoche, New York (Charlie Kaufman, 2008), Helen (Sandra Nettelbeck, 2009), Melancholia

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Bryonny Goodwin-Hawkins

for the geographies of their replication. Human bodies, however, were controlled and counted by territory. As national governments and synecdoche leaders took front stage in the naming of crisis ( Roitman 2013 ), wartime metaphors evoked both

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Review Article

Simon Grennan, Roger Sabin and Julian Waite, Marie Duval (Oxford: Myriad Editions, 2018)

David Kunzle

, shakeable like a liquid, explosive as of a bomb or bursting like a balloon – and doing disappearing acts, as in a magic show. It was all a new technology of farcical effects. Duval is particularly fond of the pars pro toto (synecdoche), with her a signature

Open access

Alessandro Testa

upon it. 2 Martínez (2019a) has indeed shown an exceptional eagerness in reflecting upon/with/in/about European anthropology (and by synecdoche, I dare to say, about Europe). 3 I will leave it to my future réprise to articulate the intellectual

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The Bunker and the Desert

On the Motif of the Cube-panel in Inside Mœbius

Renaud Chavanne

: ‘ Comment on dessine les main, déjà? ’ [How do you draw hands, again?]. Of course, the hand that draws itself is a synecdoche for the artist who draws himself ( Fig. 10 ). Figure 10. The hand that draws itself, synecdoche for the artist who draws