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In Praise of Sarah Richmond's Translation of L'Être et le néant

Matthew C. Eshleman

Nothingness should have been Self and Others . Without mentioning anything that might motivate retranslating EN , Rée dedicates a single sentence to the new translation: ‘Sarah Richmond has now produced a meticulous, elegant translation which appears to be

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Sarah Richmond's Translation of Jean-Paul Sartre's Being and Nothingness

Adrian van den Hoven

UK published a new translation by Sarah Richmond. 3 This represents a huge undertaking, and as such it marks an important milestone in Sartre scholarship. Translating L'Etre et le néant presents a basic problem, because, as Gregory Cormann, the

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Responses to Matthew Eshleman and Adrian van den Hoven

Sarah Richmond

I am so grateful to Matthew Eshleman and Adrian van den Hoven for their generous, insightful comments. Translating can be a lonely activity, especially when the text is as lengthy as BN. At the end of hours of involvement with Sartre's French – perched, as it were, on the edge of his mind – I often felt in need of other, auxiliary minds to re-centre me, to save me from toppling over completely into Sartre's consciousness and drowning. In these moments, I usually turned to dictionaries and other internet resources to bolster my critical distance; more rarely, I would email fellow translators or philosophers for help. But I have had very little of the attentive, fine-grained dialogue offered here, and I have immensely enjoyed, and benefited from, this exchange. Hopefully, SSI readers will also find it of interest.

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Editorial

John Gillespie and Sarah Richmond

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Editorial

Thinking with Sartre

Edited by John H. Gillespie and Sarah Richmond

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Book Reviews

John Gillespie, Kyle Shuttleworth, Nik Farrell Fox, and Mike Neary

Jean-Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness: An Essay in Phenomenological Ontology , trans. Sarah Richmond (London: Routledge, 2018), lxvii +848 pp., ISBN: 978-0-415-52911-2 (hardback) One of the most enjoyable and significant events of the UK

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Editorial

John Gillespie and Katherine Morris

Sarah Richmond's eagerly awaited translation of L'être et le néant , replacing Hazel Barnes's 1956 translation with a more accurate, fluent and philosophically contextualised version which will be a boon for English-speaking scholars for whom wrestling

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Editorial

John Gillespie and Katherine Morris

-length review articles on Sarah Richmond's new translation of this seminal work, and Richmond has written a response. Van den Hoven describes the new translation as ‘an important milestone in Sartre scholarship’, while Eshleman, building on this, tries, inter

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From Perception to Action

Sartre's Practical Phenomenology

Blake D. Scott

-being” rather than the other way around. 20 Yet, as Sarah Richmond has argued, despite Sartre's confidence in his demonstration, upon closer inspection the example seems more of an “unnecessary detour” than a satisfactory justification of his account of

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Sociality, Seriousness, and Cynicism

A Response to Ronald Santoni on Bad Faith

Jonathan Webber

which Sarah Richmond has introduced the translation ‘negatity’. It is an instance of nothingness. It has no being in-itself. For this reason, values exist only as supported by consciousness ( BN , 573–575). This is why a project persists only if the