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Narrating the Second World War

History Textbooks and Nation Building in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine

Lina Klymenko

and linguistic components of discourse about the Second World War in Ukrainian school history textbooks. 6 In contrast to these studies, this article conceptualizes a history textbook as an assembly of narratives, and explores how a narrative of a

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Renata Jambrešić Kirin and Reana Senjković

This article shows how the model of the ideal patriotic woman, established through propaganda activities between two competitive ideologies in Croatia during the Second World War, have been transformed and adapted to accommodate diverse genres of memory culture from 1945 until the present day. In order to indicate the inter- relation of media-ideological constructs and self-definition, the authors have compared cultural representation models of ‘acceptable’ and ‘obnoxious’ females in war time with ethnographical interviews conducted with women at the celebration of the sixtieth anniversary of the Antifašistički front žena (Women’s Anti-Fascist Front, AFŽ) Istrian Conference in 2004. The contrast between recollections and culturally constructed official memory shows how the memories of women, as autonomous historical subjects, resist the imposed collective amnesia on the anti-fascist movement, although these women also leave many ‘unsuitable truths’ untold about their subordinate role within the anti-fascist movement.

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Leo Pavlát

The Jewish Museum in Prague has as many as 40,000 items in its collections, the uniqueness of which is underlined by the exceptional circumstances under which most of them were acquired by the museum. Nearly all of the items were confiscated during the Second World War from Jews who were sent to concentration camps and from Jewish communities that were closed down.

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Gretchen Schafft

Anthropologists who were also medical doctors often had a particularly active role in the Nazi regime, including the SS. One of these, Herbert Grohmann, studied under Eugen Fischer at Kaiser Wilhelm Institut of Anthropologie (KWIA) in Berlin from 1937 to 1938 and became his assistant. Grohmann, an SS officer, was sent to Poland as the head of public health in Lodz while maintaining his association with the KWIA. This article describes the interconnections of anthropology and public health in occupied Poland including the elimination (killing) of mentally ill patients, the implementation of the Deutsche Volksliste and the culling of 'racially fit' children for abduction to Germany. All of these activities are seen through the career of Herbert Grohmann.

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Magda Veselská

The Jewish Museum in Prague (JMP) was founded as an association in 1906.2 The largest expansion of its collections occurred in tragic circumstances during the Second World War, when almost all the Judaica, books, manuscripts and archival documents of the former Jewish religious communities in the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia were gathered in the depositories of the Central Jewish Museum in Prague.3 At the time, the museum was administered by the Jewish religious community in Prague, which was put under so-called ‘national trusteeship’ after the end of the war.4 In 1949, with a view to maintaining the completeness of the museum’s collections, the legal successor to the pre-war Jewish communities – the Council of Jewish Religious Communities in the Czech Lands (hereafter cited as the Jewish Council) – definitively renounced its restitution claims to items that had been shipped to the museum during the war.

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“The Community is Everything, The Individual is Nothing”

The Second World War in Russian History Education

Dagmara Moskwa

The Second World War, often referred to in Russia as the Great Patriotic War, is considered the most important event of twentieth-century Russian history and has had a strong influence on contemporary Russian identity. The myth of the Great

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“Russia My History”

A Hi-Tech Version of an Old History Textbook

Olga Konkka

“Conceptual Framework of the New Methodological System for Russian History Teaching,” 20 both of which were adopted in 2014. As a result, the memory of the Second World War in Russia today is paradoxically both conflictual 21 and consensual. It is

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“Presentism” Versus “Path Dependence”?

Reflections on the Second World War in Russian Textbooks of the 1990s

Serguey Ehrlich

approach provides a useful framework for an analysis of presentations of the Second World War in Russian textbooks of the Yeltsin era (1992–1999), a time when old Soviet ideas and new trends clashed sharply in all spheres of social life, including textbooks

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War Memories and Online Encyclopedias

Framing 30 June 1941 in Wikipedia

Mykola Makhortykh

affects collective memories and teaching practices in post-Soviet space, this article explores how one episode of the Second World War—the capture of the Ukrainian city of Lviv by the Germans in 1941—is framed via Wikipedia. Not only does this event, which

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Transnational Cultural Propaganda

French Cultural Policies in Britain during the Second World War

Charlotte Faucher

actively opposed the French collaborationist government. Despite historians’ interest in the concept and issues around “intellectual resistance” in metropolitan France during the Second World War, 12 much remains to be said about the intellectual and