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Richard Kostelanetz

In memory of my friend Diane Dietchman Tong (1943–1998), an independent scholar who wrote her MA on the Judeo-Spanish language commonly called Ladino. There is a rumour in my family that when I was born in 1940 my parents thought about sending out a card that would read, 'Now we present our son Dick, one part kike, some parts spic'. Politically correct before everyone else, so avant-garde were they, my parents decided instead to print a more conventional announcement of my arrival.

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Julie Fette

Abstract

This article melds family history with History, tracing the lives of my daughter’s grandparents, Marcelle Libraty and Pinhas Cohen. Products of the social mobility and integration offered by the Alliance israélite universelle, they became schoolteachers in Morocco and opted for France after independence. Currently in their eighties, Marcelle and Pinhas’s lives are connected to sweeping events in history: French colonialism, Vichy anti-Semitism, Moroccan independence, Jewish emigration. Inspired by Ivan Jablonka’s L’Histoire des grandparents que je n’ai pas eus, I experiment as both narrator of the past and participant in the family story, and demonstrate new ways of writing history. This auto-historiographical project shows how a family succeeds in preserving identities of origin and maintaining relationships despite socio-political upheaval and global mobility.

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Tracy K. Harris

This paper examines the current state of Ladino as a spoken everyday language of communication. Research has shown that there are very few competent speakers of the language under the age of sixty throughout the world. Negative language attitudes as well as assimilation into the dominant cultures and choice of the dominant language(s) are contributing factors to this decline. However, this decline in linguistic skills does not reflect the promotional efforts on behalf of Ladino and Sephardic culture which are discussed at length in the paper. The end result is that language loss does not mean the decline of Sephardic ethnicity and culture, which are presently thriving.

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Charles Middleburgh, Marc Saperstein, Ursula Rudnick, and Lia D. Shimada

by Almosnino, see my Jewish Preaching 1200–1800: An Anthology (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1989), 217–239. 2 Matthias B. Lehmann, Ladino Rabbinic Literature and Ottoman Sephardic Culture (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2005

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The Ingathering of the Jewish (Moroccan) Diaspora

Zionism and Global Hometown Awareness among Spanish-Moroccan Jews in Israel

Aviad Moreno

articles she wrote for Aki Yerushalayim . The latter academic journal was supported by Sefarad, a new academic society aimed at promoting Sephardic culture in Israel, which supported MABAT. MABAT introduced to its Israeli readers articles that had been

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What Was So Funny about Les Aventures de Rabbi Jacob (1973)

A Comedic Film between History and Memory

Michael Mulvey

”: a series of nostalgic images of Ashkenazi Jewish life rather than the Sephardic cultures of those who had experienced the mellah (the Jewish neighborhoods of northern African cities) and now resided in France. Oury is a generation older than