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John Clarke

This article explores the significance of the work of Stuart Hall for social and political anthropology. It identifies the concern with concrete conjunctural analysis, the continuing attention to the problem of hegemony, and the centrality of a politics of articulation in theory and practice as core features of Hall's work. The article also touches on his complex relationship with theory and theorizing while grounding his work in a series of political and ethical commitments within and beyond the university.

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Lia Friesem

ideologies, scholars operate within a few theoretical frameworks. This article, which is a part of a broader research project focusing on resistive forms and cultural activity on Twitter, employs Stuart Hall’s (1993) ‘encoding/decoding’ model. Initially

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Translating the Bottom-Up Frame

Everyday Negotiations of the European Union's Rural Development Programme LEADER in Germany

Oliver Müller, Ove Sutter, and Sina Wohlgemuth

‘motivational’ components ( Benford and Snow 2000 ; Polletta and Chen 2012 ; Snow and Benford 1992 ; Vicari 2010 ) to the bottom-up frame. Third, we adopt Stuart Hall's theoretical distinction of different positions of ‘decoding’ or ‘reading’ in the course

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Making Sense of the Human-Nature Relationship

A Reception Study of the “Nature Is Speaking” Campaign on YouTube

Ulrika Olausson

second section presents the analytic framework, which makes use of Stuart Hall's encoding/decoding theory and the methodological tools of multimodal critical discourse analysis (MCDA). It also introduces the materials studied: YouTube comments and

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Néstor L. Silva

Literature on petroleum and its toxicities understands both as simultaneously social and ecological. Beginning with scholarship on petroleum and its toxicity that captures that simultaneity and mutual constitution, this review defines petrotoxicity as the socioecological toxicity inherent in petroleum commodification. The term signals that petroleum’s social and ecological toxicities are not merely related, but always/already interdependent and inherent in petroleum commodification. Thinking about petrotoxicity this way frames it as something similar to repressive and ideological apparatuses. Althusserian apparatuses shape subjects and spaces in violent and bureaucratic ways. Generating and resisting petrotoxic apparatuses are consistent themes of literature on petrotoxicity. Thinking with Stuart Hall’s critique of Louis Althusser, this review concludes by highlighting scholarship showing the limits of this popular framing of power, ecology, and intervention vis-à-vis petroleum. Long-term fieldwork in North Dakota’s Bakken region informs this article at various points.

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Claudia Lenz and Kirsten Heinsohn

Building on the assumption that cultural representations of the past contribute to the establishment and regulation of gendered power relations, this article investigates the representations of female participation in the Nazi regime in the German television series Hitlers Frauen. Stuart Hall's concept of decoding is used for a critical media analysis, asking how men and women are positioned as historical agents or passive objects in the series. In fact, the series plays on the gendered symbols and representations associated with the Third Reich. It reproduces traditional ideas regarding the (non)relation between femininity and politics and evokes a sexualized imaginary where women are seduced by a powerful, charismatic leader. Women are represented as dependent-materially, physically, and emotionally. In this way, the television series contributes to the continuation of traditional gender regimes. Even when the series apparently reacts to ongoing debates about women's role within the Nazi system, it disappoints those who hoped to learn about the reasons, interests, and possibilities of women between 1933 and 1945.

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“Work pays”

Slovak neoliberalism as “authoritarian populism”

Nicolette Makovicky

Focusing on the implementation of the New Social Policy in January 2004 and the social unrest that followed, this article traces the discursive construction of welfare dependence as a “Romani” problem through the creation of a media-led “moral panic”. Situating this “moral panic” within the wider context of competing populist narratives in postsocialist Slovakia, it argues that the ethnicization of the unrest constituted a rearticulation of nationalist populist symbols into liberal political logic. Employed by the opposition, the first of these narratives posited liberalization as the dispossession of the working majority by corrupt elites. This was countered by a second narrative presented by the center-right coalition that posited welfare as a system of “just rewards” for those willing to work, while constructing the Romani minority as social deviants. As such, it appeared to be a variant of what Stuart Hall has called “authoritarian populism”: an attempt by the leading coalition to harness popular discontents in order to justify exceptional levels of government intervention into social life.

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“We Owe a Historical Debt to No One”

The Reappropriation of Photographic Images from a Museum Collection

Helen Mears

-optimistic forms being circulated by a new generation of diasporic Kachin elites. As Stuart Hall has reminded us, an archive “may be largely about ‘the past’ but it is always ‘re-read’ in the light of the present and the future” (2001: 92). This article considers

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Commentary

Uneven development, the politics of scale, or global austerity?

Ida Susser

“austerity” imposed on Europe after the 2008 crash? I believe we can learn from the earlier eras and Stuart Hall's (1986) analysis of the Thatcher period in Britain as authoritarian populism. However, I think we need to be very careful to consider the

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L’heure du laitier ou la contestation

Résistance, anticolonialisme et nouvelle gauche sur une « petite théorie » de Claude Bourdet

Fabrice Usman

influencent le débat public. Nouvelle gauche indépendante D’ailleurs, c’est à cette époque que la New Left britannique naît de la rencontre de jeunes penseurs anglais et de Bourdet. Stuart Hall, sociologue et théoricien de la culture résidant en Grande