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"The Truth about the Mistake"

Perpetrator Witness and the Intergenerational Transmission of Guilt

Katharina von Kellenbach

Based on the archived correspondence between Artur Wilke, a convicted member of Sonderkommando 1005, and Hermann Schlingensiepen, a former professor of theology who acted as spiritual advisor to imprisoned Nazi perpetrators, this article examines the moral and political lessons that Nazi perpetrators communicated to their children. In a seventy-seven-page letter written to his son in 1966, Artur Wilke tried to preserve his paternal authority and moral integrity by denying personal wrongdoing. Instead, he portrayed himself as a victim of his teachers, of politicians, and of religious and legal authorities. He counseled his son to distrust the state and the law, and to submit only to divine authority. His political lessons and deep disillusionment with the German state resonated with the radical politics of the student rebellion of 1968.

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Untrue to One's Own Self: Sartre's The Transcendence of the Ego

Iker Garcia

In this paper, I elicit a number of ways in which, according to the Sartre of The Transcendence of the Ego, we can miss the truth about our own self or, more simply, about ourselves. In order to do that, I consider what I call “statements about one's own self,” that is, statements of the form “I ...” where the predicate of the statement is meant to express things that are true of what is evidently given in reflection. I argue that, although statements about one's own self can, according to Sartre, be true on final philosophical analysis, there are at least three senses in which statements about one's own self can or do miss the truth, even when they are (by hypothesis) true. How they miss the truth depends on the different level of philosophical analysis at which we take Sartre to be working.

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A Post-Truth Campaign?

The Alternative for Germany in the 2019 European Parliament Elections

Maximilian Conrad

A growing literature strongly suggests that the phenomenon often labeled as “post-truth politics” is one of the most important challenges facing liberal democracy today. 1 At the same time, the concept is highly contested as regards its novelty

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Between Two Truths

Time in Physics and Fiji

Naoki Kasuga

’ ( Moutu 2007 ), ‘arbitrage’ ( Miyazaki 2013 ), and so on. It was the difficulty of understanding the power of the leader of Viti Kabani over his followers and their truth claims that compelled me to undertake this ontological investigation ( Kasuga 2008

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John Ford's Strange Truth

Lisa Hopkins

effect produced by these reworkings is also important in its own right: the subtitle of Perkin Warbeck is ‘A Strange Truth’, and the idea is underlined by the fact that one of Perkin Warbeck' s characters is a member of the Stanley family, whose titles

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Tailoring Truth

Memory Construction and Whitewashing the Nazi Past from Below

Mikkel Dack

whatever motive, a new coherent story begins to be constructed, one that can quickly acquire self-perceived truth and even replace actual events. 15 Cognitive research supports the claim that an imagined autobiographical past can be just as memorable as a

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Jeremiah Prophet of Truth

A Psychoanalytic Exploration

Judith Elkan

In this paper I would like to explore the subject of truth and lies, and to ask the question: who is a true prophet? My intention is to use the text of Jeremiah together with my psychoanalytic framework of thought to show an interesting interplay of ideas between the two sources which may stimulate discussion and reflection on the subject.

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'No Room for Truth'

On the Precariousness of Life and Narrative in The Last of the Just

Josh Cohen

This article explores André Schwarz-Bart's famous novel, The Last of the Just, as the expression of twin crises in literary and religious representation. Ernie Levy's words, 'there is no room for truth here', spoken on the transport to Auschwitz as he cradles and comforts a dying child with stories of an idyllic afterlife, become the point of departure for a reading of the novel in terms of the loss of just this 'room for truth'. The article considers the novel's reimagining of the legend of the Lamed Vav in the light of Gershom Scholem's criticism that Schwarz-Bart compromises the legend's 'moral anarchy' before casting the novel in the light of Freud's remarks on traumatic dreams in Beyond the Pleasure Principle, as well as Emmanuel Levinas' ideas on 'useless suffering'. The last part of the article reads the novel's anguished theological motifs alongside Paul Celan's poem 'Psalm'.

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Truth and Social Relations

Durkheim and the Critique of Pragmatism

Sue Stedman Jones

Durkheim's lecture course Pragmatisme et sociologie was given in 1913-14, and thus counts amongst the last of his works. It is interesting, not just for this reason, but because here we encounter Durkheim, less in his characteristic empirical sociological mode and more as a philosopher. Here we find him engaging in a logical attack on what was then a popular movement of philosophy and debating the logical issues arising out of pragmatism. William James and the movement of pragmatism had a huge prestige on the European continent and a great influence after the turn of the century and shared a cult of admiration with Bergson (Stuart Hughes 1958:112). Durkheim challenged this on a philosophical level and found what he held to be its weakest point—the question of truth.

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A Truth that is Justice, a Writhing that is Truth

Adam Sitze

The thesis I consider in this essay takes the form of a chiasmus. Just as Heidegger’s Nazism requires us to re-evaluate his 1943 interpretation of Nietzsche as an instance of what Michel Foucault, in a 1978 interview, called a “regime of truth” (Foucault 1980: 133), so too does Foucault’s 1983 claim that a Heideggerian reading of Nietzsche determined his philosophical development (Foucault 1996: 430) call for us to inquire into the “unthought” of Foucault’s philosophical project. To re-read Heidegger by way of Foucault, I submit, is also to re-read Foucault by way of Heidegger. At stake in this thesis is how to understand Foucault’s concept of “power”. Or, more to the point, at stake is how to understand the twist with which Foucault closes that same 1978 interview: “The political question, to sum up, is not error, illusion, alienated consciousness or ideology; it is truth itself. Hence the importance of Nietzsche” (Foucault 1980: 133).