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Using a game for undergraduate global health students in the United States to practice applying ethical research principles

Sarah B. Rodriguez

research ( Crump et al. 2010 ; Crump and Sugarman 2008 ; Elit et al. 2011 ; Hanson et al. 2011 ; Melby et al. 2016 ; Nelson et al. 2010 ; Pinto and Upshur 2009 ). 1 Despite a similar growth in undergraduate programming in global health, the training

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The undergraduate field-research experience in Global Health: Study abroad, service learning, professional training or 'none of the above'?

Kearsley A. Stewart

Interest in short-term international placements in global health training for U.S.-based medical students is growing; the trend is mirrored for global health undergraduate students. Best practices in field-based global health training can increase success for medical students, but we lack a critical framework for the undergraduate global health field experience. In what ways does an undergraduate field experience in global health resemble a medical student's first international health elective? Is it more similar to a study-abroad programme or a service-learning experience with a focus on personal development, civic responsibility and community engagement? This article suggests that an undergraduate global health field experience contains features of both the international medical elective and a traditional service-learning programme. I analyse a case study of a short-term U.S.-based undergraduate global health project and explore the intersections of research, professional training and service learning.

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Enhancing and supporting the role of academic tutors in developing undergraduate writing skills: Reflections on the experiences of a social work education programme

Nathan Hughes, Sue Wainwright, and Caroline Cresswell

Whilst approaches to the development of undergraduate academic writing skills vary between disciplines and institutions, academic tutors are consistently presented as playing an important role. One aspect of this role is supporting students to engage effectively with feedback in order to develop consciousness and competence regarding academic writing. This article reports on the use of a form, which was designed to encourage students to use feedback in a structured and consistent manner and to support subsequent tutor-tutee dialogue. Students and tutors who used the form suggest it encouraged students to reflect on their learning needs and identify priority issues for discussion with the tutor. However, barriers to its effective use remain. In particular, there was resistance amongst students to accessing academic support, due to anxieties that staff would look negatively upon those who seek help. Students expressed concern that tutors would perceive those seeking support as failing to cope with the demands of independent study, a set of skills they perceive that they were required to have on arrival at university, rather than to acquire during the course of their studies with the help and guidance of their academic tutor.

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The 'Real Experience' industry: Student development projects and the depoliticisation of poverty

Jason Hickel

Participation in development projects in the Global South has become one of the most sought-after activities among American and British high school graduates and college students. In the United States this often takes the form of Alternative Spring Break trips, while in Britain students typically pursue development work during their 'gap years'. Development projects offer students a way to craft themselves in an alternative mould, to have a 'real experience' that marks them off from the cultural mainstream as 'authentic' individuals. The student development craze represents an impulse to resist consumerist individualism, but this impulse has been appropriated and neutralised by a new logic of consumption, transforming a profoundly political urge for change into a form of 'resistance' compatible with neoliberal capitalism. In the end, students' pursuit of self-realisation through development has a profoundly depoliticising effect, shifting their attention away from substantive problems of extraction and exploitation to the state of the inner self.

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Engaging Chinese international undergraduate students in the American university

Heidi Ross and Yajing Chen

Vincent Tinto's theory of academic and social integration provides a framework for investigating perceived problems associated with Chinese international students' engagement at a public research-intensive university in the U.S. Midwest ('Midwest' University). These 'problems' – classroom silence, segregation and instrumentalism – are often understood in cultural terms, and we describe sociocultural values that might influence such behaviour. We also contend that culture, on its own, cannot wholly explain the complexity of student behaviours on college campuses. In a case study of Midwest University's Business School, we show how institutional policies do much to shape Chinese students' engagement. We conclude that popular perceptions of Chinese student engagement are simplistic. Chinese students are not indifferent engagers; rather, their interaction with campus life needs to be understood as embedded within complex cultural and institutional contexts.

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Globalising service-learning in the social sciences

Stephanie A. Limoncelli

As social scientists seek to assist undergraduate students in learning about, analysing and navigating the rapid changes that have been occurring in the world today, they have sought both curricular and pedagogical transformations. Social

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Editorial

Penny Welch and Susan Wright

literacy among undergraduates. In the first article, Hanne Kirstine Adriansen and Lene Møller Madsen explore relations of coloniality in capacity-building projects between universities in the Global North and the Global South. The assumption that Western

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Editorial

Penny Welch and Susan Wright

of community amongst first-year undergraduates. In the first article, Wenya Cheng and Geethanjali Selvaretnam assess the impact of a classroom intervention aimed at increasing interactions between students from different countries and cultural

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‘Those Twins of Learning’

Cognitive and Affective Learning in an Inclusive Shakespearean Curriculum

Sheila T. Cavanagh and Steve Rowland

significant differences that sometimes emerge between standard undergraduate classes and their incarcerated counterparts. The authors share the active goal of reducing the gap they experience between these two modes of classroom experiences, but continue to

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Liminal spaces, resources and networks

Facebook as a shaping force for students’ transitions into higher education

Sally Baker and Eve Stirling

, policymakers and researchers are interested in the technological advancements that are also driving change in the higher education sector. Technology is now pervasive and ubiquitous in the lives of undergraduate students ( CLEX 2009 ; de Villiers 2010