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Paul-Henry Chombart de Lauwe

Catholicism, Social Science, and Democratic Planning

W. Brian Newsome

Over the course of his career, urban sociologist Paul-Henry Chombart de Lauwe evolved from a sociological interpreter of human needs into an advocate of the democratization of city planning. The major factors shaping this trajectory were his contacts with liberal Catholic associations, his education under ethnologist Marcel Mauss, his teaching experience at the École des cadres d'Uriage, and his own studies of working-class communities. Chombart de Lauwe took French urban sociology in novel directions and effected an important and underappreciated liberalization of city planning. Analysis of Chombart de Lauwe also challenges recent trends in the historiography of the Catholic Left.

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Lost in Hanoi

Disorientation, Travel, and Urban Space

Shane Strange

Using a 2010 trip to Hanoi, Vietnam, this article looks at the ways that disorientation is used as a trope within the urban environment and to create the traveling subject. Suggesting that travel is a form of deliberate disorientation/ orientation, the article focuses on ideas of disorientation within the urban environment and the ways they have been portrayed in Western cultural forms (the flâneur; the dérive) while suggesting these forms are not sufficient to understand the dynamics of travel. Moreover, the article focuses on two forms of travel as disorientation derived from John Zilcosky—the trope of being "lost and found" and that of "the return." Finally, the article suggests that Marcus Auge's idea of non-place is not only a sufficient way of conceptualizing contemporary notions of travel, but is also an indicator of something beyond its scope—that of globalization.

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From Urban Agriculture to Urban Food

Food System Analysis Based on Interaction Between Research, Policy, and Society

Heidrun Moschitz, Jan Landert, Christian Schader, and Rebekka Frick

Urban Agriculture in the Urban Food System Urban agriculture practice involves a new way of thinking about food, including a critique of the predominant food system. It plays a major role in making food visible and can thus support a general

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On the Rise of the House of Rothschild and the Death of Anne Frank

The Jewish Museum in Frankfurt/Main – Regional History with International Accents

Susanne Urban

Before 1933 Frankfurt was home to the second largest Jewish community in Germany after Berlin. After the Shoah, only a small Jewish remnant remained in Germany. Still, the city on the banks of the river Main remained the second largest Jewish community. This ‘tradition’ ended after 1991 with the immigration of Jews from the former Soviet Union and nowadays more Jews live in Munich than Frankfurt.

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Don Nonini

This article theorizes the urban commons in the case of the housing commons of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, from the 1960s to the present. The making and unmaking of urban commons like housing in Amsterdam can only be understood if urban commons are

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Joshua Mullenite

Barber, Benjamin R. 2017. Cool Cities: Urban Sovereignty and the Fix for Global Warming. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. 224 pp. ISBN: 978-0-300-22420-7. Günel, Gökçe. 2019. Spaceship in the Desert: Energy, Climate Change, and Urban

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The Urban Politics of Mega-Events

Grand Promises Meet Local Resistance

John Lauermann

Sports mega-events have long been promoted as drivers of urban development, based on their potential to generate physical, economic, and social legacies for host cities (see reviews in Andranovich and Burbank 2011 ; Essex and Chalkley 1998

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Urban access

Contested spaces and contested politics

Ulrich Ufer

The global Right to the City network challenges exclusionary effects of neoliberal urbanization by claiming citizens' rights for access to urban space and to the benefits of urban culture. Artists belong to one of the most vulnerable groups in the context of gentrification and urban exclusion. At the same time, their creative and expressive capacities put them in a privileged position to voice protest. Oscillating between counterhegemony, accommodation, and strategic collusion, a group of artist-activists from the city of Hamburg in Germany have been employing the means of empowered symbolism, activist art, and emancipatory knowledge in order to implement an alterpolitics of space. Their occupation of the historic Hamburg Gängeviertel has successfully repoliticized questions over urban use value and urban access, which had been purposefully excluded from the realm of the political in the revanchist, neoliberal city.

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“Urban renewal with dancing and music”?

The renewal machine's struggle to organize hegemony in Turkey

Cansu Civelek

construction in the urban renewal zone. They aspired to apartment towers, which they equated with a “luxurious” lifestyle. As they thought I must live in an apartment building, they asked me about the necessities of what they imagined a “luxurious” life entails

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Alain Bertho

Ida Susser and Stéphane Tonnelat are right to view the question of the urban commons in global cities as a crucial issue. It has precipitated massive urban and often violent struggles. We know that the ideological basis of these fights is very similar from one continent to another. Within the global space there is a global repertory of urban mobilizations and urban riots. Global cities can also be analyzed through the clashes that occur there. Where is this car burning? Beijing, Dakar, Buenos Aires, Tunis, or Mumbai? Where is the "southern world" and where is the "northern one"? When the riot erupts, who can distinguish the political regimes of the country? Against which government is this Molotov cocktail thrown? Against a democratic power or against a dictatorship? All that remains are the national peculiarities of the urban context. Why? First, because residents of global cities are faced with national states, national laws, national polices, in historical contexts. Second, because urban residents are in charge of the question of the people as a nation, as a collective subject in the heart of the cities.