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Sovereignty versus Influence

European Unity and the Conceptualization of Sovereignty in British Parliamentary Debates, 1945–2016

Teemu Häkkinen and Miina Kaarkoski

and conceptions of sovereignty in this context. We suggest that a historical analysis of the political debates concerning the concept of sovereignty in the single national case of the United Kingdom provides arguments for better understanding why

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Sharman Kadish

In the year 2001, Bevis Marks Synagogue celebrates its Tercentenary. Situated on the fringes of the City of London, this historic synagogue has been in continuous use since it was opened in 1701. As the oldest Jewish place of worship and the only Grade I Listed synagogue in the country, Bevis Marks bears silent testimony to the stability of Jewish life in Britain after 350 years. Ever since the Readmission (1656) during the Puritan Revolution, Jews have enjoyed uninterrupted settlement in Britain, a record unrivalled anywhere else in Europe.

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Matthew Moran and David Waddington

A number of academic studies have sought to comparatively analyze the French riots of 2005 with those that occurred in England in 2011, yet these have been limited in their scope and depth. In this article, we set out a more comprehensive analysis of the causes and underlying meaning of these episodes of collective disorder through a systematic application of the Flashpoints Model of Public Disorder to each case. The argument identifies and considers points of overlap and tension between the various causal factors underpinning the respective riots, engaging with both the background causes (long- and short-term) and the ‘triggering’ event that prompted a latent potential for violence to become manifest as rioting. In addition to providing an analytical framework for the comparative study of these important episodes of rioting, the article constitutes a response to recent criticisms regarding the explanatory scope of the flashpoints model and demonstrates the continued relevance of the model as a robust conceptual framework within which the anatomy of collective disorder can be dissected and understood.

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Tschüss, Perfidious Albion

German Reactions to Brexit

Eric Langenbacher

that the outcome would mirror the result of the Scottish independence referendum of September 2014, in which 55 percent voted to remain in the United Kingdom. Fissures within the British electorate were clear. London, Scotland, Northern Ireland

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Maya Shabi and Walid El Ansari

Informal Jewish educational settings are places that both affect Jewish Identity and transmit Jewish knowledge (Chazan, 1991). For instance, Jewish youth movements provide young people with social, cultural, and informal educational Jewish experiences outside of the classroom setting (Reisman, 1991). Chazan (1991) explained informal education as ‘an activity that is freely chosen by a person and that is very dependent on that person’s active involvement and positive motivation. It is not effected in any special place, but may happen in a variety of settings and venues’. Hence, informal education is not based on the fixed curriculum or grading systems which are characteristic of schools, although, it should reflect a well-defined set of goals, contents, and programmes (Chazan, 1991).

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Emptiness and its futures

Staying and leaving as tactics of life in Latvia

Dace Dzenovska

farm work used to be carried out by temporary guest workers from within the United Kingdom and Ireland. The dispossessed rural Latvians—and other Eastern Europeans—fit the bill and were actively recruited after 2004 under a gang employment structure

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Christian Schweiger

presentation. 5 The United Kingdom faced similar problems because the financial crisis had pushed it into an almost existential crisis of its banking sector. For the British Labour government led by Gordon Brown, the recapitalization of major uk -based banks

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Social Quality in Britain

A Welfare State?

Sue Hacking

This article introduces the four components of social quality from the British perspective. The main issue that this article highlights is the difference between British and European social understandings of inclusion and social policy. Development of theory around the subject matter of the four components as equal sectors of social quality could help to progress the British agenda closer towards Europe to relate the individual and the community to the formation of collective identity.

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Hinrich Voss

The purpose of this article is to analyze environmental public participation in the UK from the perspective of the polluting organization. Public participation, or an organization's stakeholder management, describes various channels available for the public to engage with and influence decision-making processes. Over the lifetime of an organization, the public seeks to engage with the organization or with specific goods or services offered. Such concerns and requests are made, and the organization responds to them, according to how salient members of the public are as stakeholders at a given time and place. Using case study examples from the UK, I illustrate the channels of engagement, the public interest groups that do engage and how effective these procedures are. It follows from this that early, inclusive and open engagement with the objective of participation in decision-making processes are the most effective public participation models and have the greatest social quality potential.

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Operationalizing the Theory of Social Quality

Theoretical and Experiential Reflections from the Development and Implementation of a Public Health Programme in the UK

Paul Ward, Paul Redgrave and Cathy Read

The main purpose of this short paper is to provide reflections on the potential to operationalise the Theory of Social Quality within public health and also on its utility for both public health policy and practice. In addition, we outline the inter-relationships between the theory of social quality and other areas of social theory and social policy. We do not attempt to provide a wide ranging or in-depth critique of social quality as it applies across the board in public health. Rather, we wish to provide an outline of a public health programme (or set of integrated interventions) which is currently running in a location in the UK (called Fit for the Future), and show how the different domains inherent within social quality may be operationalised.