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Dirk Eitzen

There is no question that violent entertainments shape popular attitudes toward violence. But do they really make the culture as a whole more violent? Can they work to make it less violent? This article considers shortcomings of conventional scholarly approaches to these questions. It outlines an alternative “ecological“ approach and tests it by examining two movies that treat violence in strikingly different fashions: The Dark Knight (2008) and Saving Private Ryan (1998). It tests empirically whether and how Saving Private Ryan actually changes college students' attitudes toward violence, and summarizes the best current psychological models of the causal connection between violent thoughts and violent behavior. The article concludes that while violent movies do indeed prompt violent ideas and impulses, these are not necessarily antisocial and can, in fact, be prosocial. The critical factor is not what they show or how they show it; it is how they are used.

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Dirk Eitzen

The impetus for this special issue of Projections was personal, not just academic.

I am deeply, religiously committed to nonviolence. I have three sons

and a daughter that I have tried to raise to share this commitment. Yet I really

relish the occasional violent entertainment and I have been fairly free in sharing

this pleasure with my children. This has led to considerable moral anxiety.

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Military Violence in Its Own Right

The Microsocial Foundations of Physical Military Violence in Noncombat Situations

Nir Gazit and Eyal Ben-Ari

identifies a number of such pathways with the most dangerous one being “forward panic” that we use as a baseline to explore three forms of military violence against civilians: controlled violence, violent entertainment, and bullying and masculinity encounters

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Brendan Rooney, Hanna Kubicka, Carl Plantinga, James Kendrick and Johannes Riis

Attractions of Violent Entertainment , and that was published in 1998. It is certainly time to take a fresh look at this compelling paradox. While much of what Bacon’s book does is synthesize ideas and arguments made elsewhere (including Goldstein