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Kate Pride Brown

on this question, but the current article will examine a factor that the literature on sustainable water consumption has not yet recognized: the visibility of water stress. I suggest that when water stress results in visible change to water supplies

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“Turban-clad” British Subjects

Tracking the Circuits of Mobility, Visibility, and Sexuality in Settler Nation-Making

Nadia Rhook

The late nineteenth century saw a wave of Indian migrants arrive in Victoria, many of whom took up the occupation of hawking. These often-described “turban-clad hawkers” regularly became visible to settlers as they moved through public space en route to the properties of their rural customers. This article explores how the turban became a symbol of the masculine threat Indians posed to the settler order of late nineteenth-century Victoria, Australia. This symbolism was tied up with the two-fold terrestrial and oceanic mobility of 'turban-clad' men; mobilities that took on particular meanings in a settler-colonial context where sedentarism was privileged over movement, and in a decade when legislators in Victoria and across the Australian colonies were working out ways to exclude Indian British subjects from the imagined Australian nation. I argue that European settlers' anxieties about the movements of Indian British subjects over sea and over land became metonymically conflated in ways that expressed and informed the late nineteenth-century project to create a settled and purely white nation. These findings have repercussions for understandings of the contemporaneous emergence of nationalisms in other British settler colonies.

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Frontiers of Visibility

On Diving Mobility in Underwater Films (1920s to 1970s)

Franziska Torma

This article deals with the history of underwater film and the role that increased mobility plays in the exploration of nature. Drawing on research on the exploration of the ocean, it analyzes the production of popular images of the sea. The entry of humans into the depths of the oceans in the twentieth century did not revitalize myths of mermaids but rather retold oceanic myths in a modern fashion. Three stages stand out in this evolution of diving mobility. In the 1920s and 1930s, scenes of divers walking under water were the dominant motif. From the 1940s to the 1960s, use of autonomous diving equipment led to a modern incarnation of the “mermen“ myth. From the 1950s to the 1970s, cinematic technology was able to create visions of entire oceanic ecosystems. Underwater films contributed to the period of machine-age exploration in a very particular way: they made virtual voyages of the ocean possible and thus helped to shape the current understanding of the oceans as part of Planet Earth.

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A Resolute Display

Culture, Life and Intersectional Identity in Israeli Druze Photography

Lindsey Pullum

In this article, I analyse a collection of photographs from the Israeli Druze village Daliyat al-Carmel during the summer of 2015. I locate these photographs of Druze life within the current movement of Israeli/Palestinian photography and mobilise this photographic archive as a form of decolonisation and visual critique relating to the Israeli state. Through a close analysis of photographs documenting residents and activities of Daliyat al-Carmel from the 1930s to the 1970s, I argue photographs of Druze unsettle dominant tropes within Israeli and Palestinian visual discourse. The result is the production of an expanded visibility, which nuances our understanding of Arab Israeli life after 1948 and the intersectionality of the Druze community in terms of culture and Israeli-Palestinian relationships.

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Introduction

Visibility and Screen Politics after the Transgender Tipping Point

Wibke Straube

This past decade has witnessed not only an increase in trans and non-binary visibility in screen cultures, but also a growing social awareness concerning the increase in violence against trans and non-binary people. While trans and non-binary people have become more recognized and visible in Western society, at the same time they have also been scrutinized with growing intensity.

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Ricardo Campos

This article is the result of research that focused on street art and graffiti in the city of Lisbon from 2004 to 2007. The empirical arguments presented draw from ethnographic work and from an analysis of inscriptions on urban walls. In my understanding, these visual manifestations can be understood as political and aesthetic devices, fundamental expressive resources in the negotiation of power and agency in the urban environment. They are vernacular creations that may be interpreted as discursive instruments forged in the context of symbolic struggles, characteristic of the 'field of visibility'. Furthermore, I put forward an analytical framework of graffiti and street art as an urban transgressive grammar, while considering the articulation of produced text and the context of production.

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The (In)visibility of the Iberian Lynx

From Vermin to Conservation Emblem

Margarida Lopes-Fernandes and Amélia Frazão-Moreira

Not much is known about how the cultural image of predators has been constructed in Western contexts and changed through time. This article reviews representations of lynx in Western Europe. A ‘cultural map’ of lynx in historical contexts is presented, and the ‘social visibility’ of the Iberian lynx in Portugal explored. Since prehistoric times the lynx has been an inspiration, an amulet, a creature gifted with extraordinary capacities but also a food item, and a ‘vermin’ to eliminate. Recently, the Iberian lynx has become a global conservation emblem; once a noxious predator, it is now a symbol of wilderness. Examples show how the species acquired visibility and has been appropriated in contemporary contexts such as logos, ‘green’ marketing, urban art or political campaigns. There is also evidence of a new identity construction in Portuguese rural areas where lynx is being reintroduced, exemplifying a process of objectification of nature.

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"Leur Histoire est Notre Histoire"

Immigrant Culture in France Between Visibility and Invisibility

Brigitte Jelen

On the leaflets announcing the opening in 2007 of a new Center for Immigration History in Paris, one can read the following sentence: “Leur histoire est notre histoire: la place des immigrés dans la construction de la France” [Their history is our history: the place of immigrants in the construction of France].2 What may appear, initially, as a trivial opposition between “their history” and “our history” reveals in fact a great deal about the underlying assumptions of the project.

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Sarah Banet-Weiser

This article analyzes an emergent genre of tween and teen girl confessional videos on YouTube where girls ask their viewers to comment on whether they are pretty or not. While the very existence of this genre is frequently explained away as a symbol of young girls' dwindling self-esteem in the contemporary moment, this article locates them within a self-identificatory gendered neoliberal brand culture so as to examine the ways in which they reproduce an economic model of the successful white middle class girl.

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In/visible—In/secure

Optics of regulation and control

Ieva Jusionyte and Daniel M. Goldstein

As a contribution to the development of the critical anthropology of security, this theme section explores the uncertain yet complementary relationships between security and visibility, or rather—to highlight the ambiguity of the connection