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Nigel Rapport

This article is an interweaving of three strands: an account by Imre Kertesz of his experiences in Nazi concentration camps during the Second World War, which he published as the novel, Fateless; an account of a walking tour in Suffolk that the German Anglophile, W. G. Sebald, published as the travelogue, The Rings of Saturn; and my own account of visiting the Auschwitz memorial site, which has been constructed on the edge of the Polish city still bearing the same name. Linking the three strands is the issue of the phenomenology of walking: the consciousness that is capacitated by this activity and the accompanying power to interpret one's life and surroundings in imaginative ways. Kertesz would walk the Nazi lager without stopping for death; Sebald would walk the Suffolk landscape without admitting the passage of time; I would walk Auschwitz without falling victim to the systemic constructions of others. For all, the physical activity is linked to becoming conscious of certain symbolic patterns in time and space. Walking, this article concludes, entails both a phenomenological objectivity, which may be appreciated by virtue of a common human embodiment, and a phenomenological subjectivity: an individual consciousness engaging in imaginative projects of disembodiment and otherness.

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Walking Without Purpose

Sensations of History and Memory in Nagasaki City Rupert Cox

Rupert Cox

This article engages with two well-known episodes in Nagasaki's history by examining the everyday relationships between the discursive space of museums and the embodied space of walking. It is an examination of the exhibitive strategies and image conventions of sixteenth-century painted screens, namban byôbu, which depict the contact between Iberian visitors and city residents, and photographs of the trauma inflicted on victims of the atomic bombing of 1946. These two images collide in the presentation of the city to tourists, and I examine the ways that a new program of guided walks creates the opportunity for participants to experience commonplace sounds as the ephemeral residue of history. These sensations are made possible by the peripatetic routes that the guides, being long-term residents of the areas, create out of their own experiences.

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Walking Back to Happiness?

Modern Pilgrimage and the Expression of Suffering on Spain's Camino de Santiago

Keith Egan

This article examines the experiences of walkers along the Spanish Camino de Santiago pilgrimage. It explores their journeys as exercises in narrative adjustment, social practices, and somatic experiences of a crippling loss of control over the course of their lives. Using a phenomenological method of descriptions, the article argues that mobility is a trope that expresses existential issues in a bodily idiom. It draws attention to the value of inter-subjective experience as a potential source of existential mobility, one that finds metaphorical expression in the slow daily rhythms structuring pilgrims' journeys and that impacts on the researcher as much as the pilgrims.

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Walking to Write

Following Patrick Leigh Fermor across Europe

David Wills

Jeremy Cameron , Never Again: A Walk from Hook of Holland to Istanbul (Oxford: Signal Books, 2014), 240 pp. ISBN: 978-1-908493-96-5, $18.45 (paperback). Nick Hunt , Walking the Woods and the Water: In Patrick Leigh Fermor’s Footsteps from the

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Walking with the Goat-God

Gothic Ecology in Algernon Blackwood’s Pan’s Garden: A Volume of Nature Stories

Michelle Poland

rejection of Christianity. Blackwood was also a devoted walker – walking is a practice that bears close relation to writing; think Wordsworth, after all. In the autumn of 1886, Blackwood moved to a guesthouse situated in a Swiss village called Bôle with two

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Steven Lovatt

with reference to Edwards’ depression and, in particular, her attempts to overcome it by walking. In doing all of the above, I hope to extend the criticism of Edwards and to suggest new lines of enquiry for future commentators. Time and Space in the

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Julie Sanders

There is much current interest in walking as a social and physiological practice in disciplines from literature to geography, from anthropology to performance studies. 'Walking Studies' impact Shakespearean scholarship and in particular work relating to Shakespeare-freighted sites such as Stratford-upon-Avon, where the loaded discourses of tourism and personal encounter are predominant in the practical experience of visitors. This article asks what it might mean, either for the individual or the collective, to 'walk with Shakespeare' and whether the 'Shakespeare' that we locate in these experiences is always already a construct, fashioned to feed the demands of a national economy and the gross national product by drawing millions of visitors to an otherwise fairly nondescript Midlands market town. It explores the possibility that walking with 'Shakespeare' may mean walking with an available icon but not with the complex textual, performative, and historical Shakespeares at the heart of academic scholarship.

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Rikke Schubart

Looking at television series True Blood (2008-), The Vampire Diaries (2009-), and The Walking Dead (2010-), this article analyzes positive emotions in horror: the sexual emotions, trust, and hope. The article starts by substituting the positive-negative dichotomy of emotions with seeing emotions as coming in a “package“ (Solomon) and having a “story“ (Frijda), thus working together and not in opposition. It goes on to discuss the interaction of predation and sex in True Blood, torture and trust in The Vampire Diaries, and disgust, despair, and hope in The Walking Dead. The article then considers horror emotions, positive and negative, from a functional and evolutionary perspective. Comparing horror to play fighting and fiction to the pretend of play, the article suggests four reasons why horror is attractive: we learn to feel emotions (sensation), to react to emotions (evaluation), control our emotions (action tendency in the here-and-now), and to experiment (action tendency and planning for what comes next).

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Walking Memory

Berlin's “Holocaust Trail“

Maria Pia Di Bella

Since the early 1990s, Berlin has developed what I call a “Holocaust trail“-circa twenty-five officially dedicated memorial sites recalling significant historical events leading to the Final Solution-without acknowledging it yet as a “trail.“ Berlin is already well known for its two famous museums-memorials: the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe (2005) and the Jewish Museum (2001), two strong statements meant to show how the town deals with the heritage of the Holocaust, how it tries to underline the absolute impossibility of its erasure from social memory and to fight revisionism. The different memorial sites of the Holocaust trail came into existence thanks to multiple initiatives that allowed the town to become a true laboratory for the politics of memory concerning the crimes of the Nazi state and the sufferings of the Jewish citizens that fell victim to the state's genocide.

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Walking Upright Together

Why and How Jewish-Christian-Muslim Trialogue Makes Sense

Guy W. Rammenzweig

This is not the kind of lecture which old-fashioned German academics would present. It is much more a statement about my own 'learning' in the field of JCM trialogue: interfaith work amongst Jews, Christians and Muslims. Preparing my lecture I went through the writings of Wilfred Cantwell Smith, Raimundo Panikkar, John B. Cobb, Hans Küng and Jonathan Magonet again. I felt that most of the ideas and suggestions these great scholars of interreligous theology have made will be addressed directly or 'along the way' when I give you a rather personal account of my own interfaith pilgrimage: how my spirituality, my theology and my work have changed.