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The Ill-Equipped Modernist

Historicizing Édouard Dujardin’s Les Lauriers Sont Coupés

Kelly J. Maynard

in its own right, analyzing its interiority as an innovative product of overlapping aesthetic milieus symptomatic of the French fin de siècle, including symbolism, Wagnerism, modernism, and subjectivism. 2 In this article, I explore Les Lauriers

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Mitchell Cohen

Der Fliegende Holländer by Richard Wagner, at the Teatro delle Opera di Roma (April 1997).

Der Ring des Nibelungen by Richard Wagner, at the Metropolitan Opera (New York, April-May 1997).

Der Ring des Nibelungen by Richard Wagner, at the Festspielhaus (Bayreuth, July-August 1995).

Tristan und Isolde by Richard Wagner, at the Festspielhaus (Bayreuth, July 1995).

Barry Millington, “Nuremberg Trial: Is there Anti-Semitism in DieMeistersinger?” Cambridge Opera Journal 3 (3 November 1991), pp. 247-260.

Cecelia Hopkins Porter, The Rhine as a Musical Metaphor: Cultural Identity in German Romantic Music (Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1996).

Frederic Spotts, Bayreuth: A History of the Wagner Festival (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1994).

Michael Tanner, Wagner (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996). Marc A. Weiner, Richard Wagner and the Anti-Semitic Imagination (Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1995).

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Giving Aid Inside the Home

Humanitarian House Visits, Performative Refugeehood, and Social Control of Syrians in Jordan

Ann-Christin Wagner

Bedouins in the area. The Mafraq Unity Church, an associate of a global Evangelical movement, was established in 1948. Today, it has turned into one of the main aid providers for Syrians ( Wagner 2018 ). As for my own engagement with VIVA, it comes out of

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Franco Ruzzenenti and Aleksandra Wagner

mainstream media often presents energy issues in the context of the economy (investment, prices, cost, and profits), as well as geopolitics (securitization, independence, and weaponization) ( Wagner 2018 ). Issues brought to the public by alternative

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Afterword

The Lottery of Babylon, or, the Logic of Happenstance in Melanesia and Beyond

Roy Wagner

Are such things as luck, chance, and fortune 'given' or original proper ties of the natural order of things, or are they perverse consequences of some misguided attempt to find out whether they exist or not? Does God play dice, or do the dice merely play God? How is that a sense of supernatural power, which often accompanies 'uncannily' good luck, is discovered, known about, or activated in a society that may not have precise equivalents for our ideas of chance and fortune? This article cites examples drawn from Mesopotamian notions of creation, from the Daribi of interior Papua and the Barok of New Ireland, that explain how this process might unfold. Luck and fortune have to do with any kind of strategy that destroys the opposition, most often through the underdetermination of thought.

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Michael F. Wagner

Automobilism—the culture of individual mobility based on private transportation—is promoted by leisure, consumption, the construction of infrastructure, and the provision of service by auto clubs. It promises to carry the driver away on a voyage of discovery with narratives of adventurousness and dreams of the good life on the road. It was from the outset an international movement with national repercussions and variations on a theme. Basically, however, the rise of European automobile culture accompanied the rise of consumption for leisure, which in turn evolved into a consumption regime of mediation and consumption junctions based on individual mobility and tourism.

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Introduction

Beyond Orientalism; Texting the Victorian East

Julia Kuehn and Tamara S. Wagner

Thirty years after its publication in 1978, a reconsideration of Edward Said’s Orientalism invites a shift from contextual and colonial discourse analysis towards a renewed attention to ambiguities of form and structure. The central point of interest of this special issue, ‘Re-Imagining the Victorian Orient’, hinges upon close readings of canonical and noncanonical texts, side by side, in order to highlight the complexities of Victorian literary culture that earlier readings often threatened to deny. The analyses comprise discussions of travel writing as well as of fiction from the 1830s up to the 1920s, covering what is commonly considered the height of imperialism. What brings the essays in this special issue together is the project of opening up the question of the Victorian Orient as a concept and a literary topos, based upon, but also beyond the critical tenets of Orientalism. While this project is rooted in literary history and the history of representation, its main emphasis firmly rests on a ‘texting’ of the Victorian East: an emphasis on genre, aesthetics, and structural metaphors. This collection is held together by the places it foregrounds as much as by this critical redirection towards textual analysis. Divided into two parts, it reads women’s travelogues covering the Middle East, South, and South East Asia, comparing and contrasting them with the ‘notorious’ colonial novels of Dickens, Conrad, Kipling, and Forster.

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Katherine Isobel Baxter, Robert Hampson, Julia Kuehn, Grace Moore, Pablo Mukherjee, Kaori Nagai, Muireann O'Cinneide, Alison Sainsbury, and Tamara S.con Wagner

Notes on contributors

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SherriLynn Colby-Bottel, Joshua Reno, Tal Liron, Genevieve Lakier, Andrew Tarter, Adam Henne, Joseph Doyle Hankins, Peter Rudiak-Gould, Sharla Blank, J. Stephen Lansing, Alaka Wali, John Wagner, David Zurick, Robert Fletcher, and Brian Grabbatin

BUTTON, Gregory, Disaster Culture: Knowledge and Uncertainty in the Wake of Human and Environmental Catastrophe

FALASCA-ZAMPONI, Simonetta, Waste and Consumption: Capitalism, the Environment, and the Life of Things

FIJN, Natasha, Living with Herds: Human-Animal Coexistence in Mongolia

GUNERATNE, Arjun, ed., Culture and the Environment in the Himalaya

HASTRUP, Frida, Weathering the World: Recovery in the Wake of the Tsunami in a Tamil Fishing Village

JOHNSTON, Barbara Rose, ed., Life and Death Matters: Human Rights, Environment and Social Justice

KIRBY, Peter Wynn, Troubled Natures: Waste, Environment, Japan

MCADAM, Jane. ed., Climate Change and Displacement: Multidisciplinary Perspectives

MENZIES, Charles R., Red Flags and Lace Coiff es: Identity and Survival in a Breton Village

MORAN, Emilio F., Environmental Social Science: Human-Environment Interactions and Sustainability

NEWING, Helen, Conducting Research in Conservation: A Social Science Perspective

PARR, Joy, Sensing Changes: Technologies, Environments, and the Everyday, 1953–2003

RADEMACHER, Anne M., Reigning the River: Urban Ecologies and Political Transformation in Kathmandu

RUTHERFORD, Stephanie, Governing the Wild: Ecotours of Power

WALKER, Peter A. and Patrick T. HURLEY, Planning Paradise: Politics and Visioning of Land Use in Oregon

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The Art of Losing One's Own Culture Isn't Hard to Master, It's Obviation

Roy Wagner, Gregory Bateson, and the Art of Science Writ Large

Elizabeth Stassinos

Like Gregory Bateson, Roy Wagner leaves no heirs. This is not the curse of Souw, but the curse of original thinking. Like Bateson though, Wagner has bequeathed to a future anthropology a certain style of thinking about Others, an elegant way of dislocating the Western self from its routines, its kinships, its ego, its diaspora. In this paper, and as a student of Wagner’s at Virginia in the 1980s and 1990s, I hope to trace some of Wagner’s work through Bateson’s and to compare some of the habits of mind of these two ethnographers and theorists and relate these back to The Invention of Culture. If I seem to forget that text in places or re-start it in others, it is because I have tried to stay close to that topic that led both in such opposite (one could say complementary schizmogenic) directions, one to biological sciences, the other to science fiction. I section off observations on their ethnographic theory by using poetry to express shifts in topics for, at their best, Wagner and Bateson are poets of that extreme human condition so sought after by ethnographers, culture shock.