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Alice Wilson

Revisiting 'the margins' as an illuminating conceptual space analogous to, yet distinct from, the exception, this article explores the Arab Spring from its margins to highlight 'silencing effects' that, if they underpin the problematic notions of the Arab Spring and Arab exceptionalism, assume spectacular dimensions at the margins, namely, the 'disappearance' of an uprising. The disputed territory of Western Sahara, partially annexed by Morocco since 1975, saw an unprecedented uprising in October-November 2010. Annexed Western Sahara's uprising narrowly preceded Tunisia's, conventionally recognized as the first of the Arab Spring. Despite Sahrawis' perceptions of similarities between their uprising and the Arab Spring, Western Sahara's uprising is overlooked in most analyses of the Arab Spring. 'Silencing effects' obscure these similarities and, ultimately, the uprising itself.

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Replenishing Milk Sons

Changing Kinship Practices among the Sahrāwī, North Africa

Konstantina Isidoros

. Both Sahrāwī male and female interlocutors felt strongly about asserting their logic and saw themselves as a population of highly specialised desert nomadic pastoralists who had occupied the western Sahara for at least three millennia. Milk kinship

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Frauke Mennes, John P. Hayes, David Kloos, Martha Lagace, Morten Koch Andersen, Somdeep Sen, Matthew Porges, and Sa’ed Atshan

a camel bearing the brand of the Polisario Front. Polisario is a revolutionary movement demanding independence for Western Sahara and more recently functions as a sort of movement/party (the only one) within the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic (SADR

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Introduction

Traces of Pan Africanism and African Nationalism in Africa Today

Denis Goldberg

powers and is a consultative body. It has 265 members from 53 countries in Africa, but excluded Morocco over its refusal to give freedom to Western Sahara. (Presumably with the coming into existence of South Sudan there will be another 5 members in due

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Introduction

Emerging Kinship in a Changing Middle East

Soraya Tremayne

refugee camps in the western Sahara Desert, whose kinship structure has faced increasing threat of disruption, and points out that the Sahrāwī women, faced with the possibility of losing their kin men, who are traders and on the move, have created new milk

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Ajume H. Wingo

, Tunisia and Western Sahara, plus the Arab population of Mauritania, Northern Sudan and Northern Chad, and so on for the rest of the states. Again, these intellectual were playing by Berlin conference rules and nothing else. How many indigenous Africans did