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Gauging the Propagandist’s Talents

William Le Queux’s Dubious Place in Literary History: Part One

A. Michael Matin

Shortly after the outbreak of World War One, Charles Masterman was appointed by Prime Minister Asquith to oversee a covert literary propaganda campaign in support of the British war effort. Although William Le Queux had been one of the most prominent British anti-German writers during the prewar years, he was not recruited for this governmental endeavour that included many of the nation’s best-known writers. Nonetheless, he continued on his own to publish anti-German propaganda throughout the war. These two articles assess Le Queux’s national security-oriented writings within that broader context, and they offer a methodology for gauging the potential efficacy of such texts based on recent developments in the field of risk-perception studies. Part One provides a historical and methodological foundation for both articles and assesses a number of Le Queux’s pre-1914 works. Part Two (published in Part II of this issue) examines Le Queux’s career and writings from 1914 through to his death in 1927.

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Gauging the Propagandist’s Talents

William Le Queux’s Dubious Place in Literary History: Part Two

A. Michael Matin

Shortly after the outbreak of World War One, Charles Masterman was appointed by Prime Minister Asquith to oversee a covert literary propaganda campaign in support of the British war effort. Although William Le Queux had been one of the most prominent British anti-German writers during the prewar years, he was not recruited for this governmental endeavour that included many of the nation’s best-known writers. Nonetheless, he continued on his own to publish anti-German propaganda throughout the war. These two articles assess Le Queux’s national security-oriented writings within that broader context, and they offer a methodology for gauging the potential efficacy of such texts based on recent developments in the field of risk-perception studies. Part One (published in Part I of this issue) provides a historical and methodological foundation for both articles and assesses a number of Le Queux’s pre-1914 works. Part Two examines Le Queux’s career and writings from 1914 through to his death in 1927.

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Philo of Stockholm

The Unrequited Love of Rabbi Marcus Ehrenpreis

Göran Rosenberg

Abstract

Dr Marcus Ehrenpreis was already a prominent figure on the European Jewish scene when he in 1914 travelled through the first pangs of World War One to become the Chief Rabbi of Stockholm, a small and largely dormant Jewish community in the periphery of Jewish life in Europe. This would seem an unexpected move by a man who had served as the personal secretary of Theodor Herzl at the first Zionist congress in Basel 1897 and as the Chief Rabbi of Bulgaria for fourteen years and who had made himself known as a leading proponent for making Hebrew the language of a Jewish spiritual and cultural renewal. Instead he was to make Sweden and the Swedish language (!) the central elements of his remaining life and the experimental ground for his vision of a deepened and energized spiritual and cultural Judaism in a dynamic relationship with the non-Jewish world.

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Law and Liberation

Critical Notes on Agamben’s Political Messianism

Jayne Svenungsson

facto taking place in democratic societies. Agamben portrays the current judicial-political system as a ‘killing machine’, which has ‘continued to function almost without interruption from World War One, through fascism and National Socialism, and up to

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Richard Bessel

, “War and the Context of General History in an Age of Total War: Comment on Peter Paret, ‘Justifying the Obligation of Military Service,’ and Michael Howard, ‘World War One: The Crisis in European History,’” Journal of Military History 57, no. 5 (1993

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“Till I Have Done All That I Can”

An Auxiliary Nurse’s Memories of World War I

Michelle Moravec

World War One (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 2014). 6 David Bernard Dearinger, Paintings and Sculpture in the Collection of the National Academy of Design: 1826–1925 (New York: Hudson Hills, 2004), 457. 7 “Reports from London, England; Savannah, GA

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Lest We Forget (Matter)

Posthumanism, Memory, and Exclusion

Matthew Howard

involvement in World War One. Officially, aboriginal Australians were not allowed to volunteer for the Anzacs—unapologetically on the basis of race—so they were kept out of representations and accounts of soldiers in Europe. The fact that thousands did manage

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Hamlet’s Catch-22

A Psychoanalytic Reading of Hamlet and Catch-22

Bahareh Azad and Pyeaam Abbasi

First World War. One of the other functions of the game in the novel, besides subversiveness, is what Freud dubs ‘fort da game’, (the game played by an eighteen-month-old boy – using a reel he throws out of his cot and a piece of string to pull it back