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The Hyphen Cannot Hold

Contemporary Trends in Religious-Zionism

Hayim Katsman

to understand them as a sui generis Religious-Zionist phenomenon, despite their divergence from ‘mainstream’ Religious-Zionist ideology. Understanding the Hyphen In order to distinguish them from the non-Zionist Haredim, the Religious

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Of Other Cinematic Spaces

Urban Zionism in Early Hebrew Cinema

Hizky Shoham

The Zionist ethos is commonly described as pro-rural and anti-urban, with the imagined Zionist space perceived as being rural and the Zionist drama as a reflection of the life of the pioneers in Palestine. Recent studies of early Hebrew cinema shared this view. This article analyzes two Jewish films from inter-war Palestine, Vayehi Bimey (In the Days of Yore) (1932, Tel Aviv) and Zot Hi Ha'aretz (This Is the Land) (1935, Tel Aviv), to suggest a more complex view of the Zionist ethos and spatial imagery in the context of the relationship between the urban and the rural. A thematic and formal analysis of the films shows their sources of Soviet influence and reveals the presentation of the city as a nationalist space.

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Yuval Shaked

In this lecture I should like to describe and discuss certain aspects of the multilayered phenomenon of ‘Jewish sacred music by Israeli composers’. These are solely marginal aspects of a continuous, dynamic, contradictory and quite fragmented process, in which Israeli ‘identity’ has been situated ever since Zionist ideology began to shape it in a definitive manner.

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Bernhard Wasserstein

Dr. Likhovski’s book is a formidable achievement that has relevance for the development of Israeli law, for students of comparative legal systems, particularly colonial ones, for the history of Zionist ideology, and for conceptualizers of legal anthropology. I shall focus on only a few aspects of his work from the standpoint of a political historian of Mandatory Palestine.

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Matthew J. Sherman

Ideations of corporeality are situated at the crux of "muscular Judaism" in early twentieth- century Europe. The sporting event was viewed as a battlefield for equalization. In the ideological context of Muskeljudentum, the apathy of Talmudjudentum (Talmudic Judaism) was replaced by exercise, in which the strengthening of the corporeal would rejuvenate the psychical. Jewish strongman Siegmund Breitbart capitalized on his masculine feats of strength and aesthetic appeal by creating public performances, which displayed not only militarized corporeality, but also provided a stage for the promotion of "muscular Judaism," through both symbolic and literal representations of Zionist ideology. Breitbart reappropriated masculine Jewish corporeality, embodied corporeal notions of reciprocity at the core of Muskeljudentum, and found individual agency through the militarized aesthetic and motion of his body.

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Negating Diaspora Negation

Children's Literature in Jewish Palestine During the Holocaust Years

Yael Darr

For years, it had been assumed that since the end of the Second World War and up until the Eichmann trial in 1961, Hebrew culture in Israel tended to repress the Holocaust or narrate it according to the Zionist ideology's viewpoint – to accentuate the events of the rebellion against the Nazis and to infer from them a lesson of national revival and restoration. The consensus concerning children's literature, in particular, maintained that it had been utterly committed in the early decades of statehood to extracting out of the Holocaust a 'fortifying tale' bearing a national lesson. This paper, however, argues the existence of a developed Holocaust discourse in children's literature written in Jewish Palestine during the war years, and suggests that children's literature even predated adult literature in setting the Holocaust theme at centre stage. This article aims to shed light on a rare narrative in the Israeli public discourse of the Holocaust: the literary story told to Jewish children in Palestine during the years of the Holocaust. At the time, this new narrative for children was extensive and diverse. For the first time in the history of Zionist children's literature, it challenged the Diaspora-negating code that had been dominant since its beginning. Nevertheless, only a few years later, with the founding of the State of Israel, this new narrative was rapidly 'forgotten' by the Israeli collective memory and proceeded to be neglected by literary and educational research as well. Although it spanned a short time period and failed to leave a literary impact on writings for children in Israel, this Holocaust narrative is tremendously important, having evoked the unique voice of the Jewish settlement in Palestine (the Yishuv) during the Second World War. It also serves as a case study of the crucial function of children's literature within the public discourse during traumatic times, illuminating the advantages of children's literature as a marginal and peripheral form of communication in the public domain.

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The Word of the Lord to Shylock

Biblical Forms in the Translations of Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice to Hebrew

Atar Hadari

’ need to discuss issues of ideology, identity, and religion through vehicles other than an existing hegemony of Zionist ideology. 9 These observations seem to have been corroborated by the test sample of one word that was translated with a biblical

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From Yehuda Etzion to Yehuda Glick

From Redemptive Revolution to Human Rights on the Temple Mount

Shlomo Fischer

elaborated by R. Avraham Yitzhak HaKohen Kook (hereinafter R. Kook) and by his son, R. Tzvi Yehudah, and has been an important component in radical religious Zionist ideology in general and especially of Gush Emunim. Indeed, one of the central justifications

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The End Point of Zionism

Ethnocentrism and the Temple Mount

Tomer Persico

, 23 July . Falach , Baruch . 2010 . “The ‘Sulam’ Journal: Between Poetry and Politics.” [In Hebrew.] PhD diss., Bar-Ilan University . Fischer , Shlomo . 2007 . “Self-Expression and Democracy in Radical Religious Zionist Ideology.” PhD diss

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Dan Avnon, Nitzan Lebovic, Raymond Cohen, Elie Friedman, Sara Helman, Gad Barzilai, and Ari Ariel

Palestine and Israel, which, Raviv argues, reflects the development of Zionist ideology and Israeli nationalism. Chapter 1 addresses the place of agricultural labor in the Zionist project during the early periods of migration to Palestine. Raviv introduces