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Intellectual endogamy in the university

The neoliberal regulation of academic work

Ana Luisa Muñoz-García

and one private university, both located in Santiago, and a third public university located in southern Chile. It is excerpted from a broader study about academic mobility and the construction of knowledge in academia. The larger project examines how

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Reflecting on the mobile academic

Auto-ethnographic writing in the knowledge economy

Brigitte Bönisch-Brednich

This article examines what it means to be an academic in the knowledge economy, using auto-ethnographic writing or storytelling as its starting point. Although academic mobility has been researched for about a decade, deep listening and deep reading in the context of ethnography have not been utilised in analysing what it means to move in this global space. To conduct this exercise, fellows from the European Union-funded Universities in the Knowledge Economy project who were all mobile academics, were invited to participate in ethnographic writing workshops and explore the personal, subjective elements of narrating their experiences of being mobile and being migrants. I aim to not only present the narratives of colleagues who populate the global knowledge economy but also analyse them and ask if certain ideal forms of narrative habitus support academic mobility.

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Encounters with borders

A migrant academic's experiences of the visa regime in the Global North

Priya Dixit

focus on the processes of surveillance and categorisation prior to getting to the airport, processes that centre race and affect Global South academic mobilities. The article is organised as follows: 1 The next section briefly discusses race and

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‘I’m like a snail carrying my entire house with me’

Doctoral fellows’ experiences of a mobile life

Lisbeth Kristine Olesen Walakira and Susan Wright

EU policies promote mobility as a part of contemporary doctoral education. EU-funded doctoral candidates are expected to move country, establish international research networks; travel for workshops, conferences and research stays abroad; and collaborate across disciplines as well as work in other sectors during their doctoral training. As far as EU policies are concerned, competence in all these ‘mobilities’ is essential for future knowledge workers in a competitive, global economy. But how do doctoral fellows themselves experience mobility? A survey of 3,410 EU-funded doctoral fellows shed light on their experiences of geographical, sectoral, interdisciplinary and social mobility. It showed that many PhD candidates are excited by the opportunities they see in their doctoral programmes, but they often experience tensions between their professional and personal desires.

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Book Reviews

Maria Karaulova, Patrick McGovern, and Tim Battin

Qiongqiong Chen (2017) Globalization and Transnational Academic Mobility: The Experiences of Chinese Academic Returnees Singapore: Springer, 143 pp., ISBN 9789812878847

Brian Caterino (2016) The Practical Import of Political Inquiry London: Palgrave Macmillan, 117 pp., ISBN 973319324425

Morten Levin and Davydd J. Greenwood (2016) Creating a New Public University and Reviving Democracy: Action Research in Higher Education New York: Berghahn Books, 220 pp., ISBN 9781785333217

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How has mobility become central to the EU’s idea of doctoral education?

A brief overview of the history of a policy idea

Pavel Zgaga

This article addresses why and how mobility has become central to the EU’s idea of doctoral education, aiming to reconstruct, in a historical perspective, the gradual conceptualisation of mobility as a policy idea. This process began with the discussion of academic mobility in the 1970s, when the European Communities had as yet no responsibility in the field of education, which resulted in the Erasmus Programme. In the late 1990s, the Bologna Process strengthened the discussion, substantially contributing to a consideration of mobility as a policy tool and the establishment of a mobility strategy. In connection with the EU research policy, the integration of doctoral studies into the Bologna Process is specifically analysed. The article concludes with some open questions, including the potentially negative consequences of the instrumentalisation of higher education for the concept of mobility.

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Book Reviews

Claudia Lieb, Donald Weber, Anita Perkins, Monika Domman, Manuel Appert, Liz Millward, Ueli Haefeli, Heloise Finch-Boyer, Natalie Roseau, Charissa Terranova, Massimo Moraglio, Christopher Neumaeier, and Clay McShane

Christian Kassung, Die Unordnung der Dinge. Eine Wissens- und Mediengeschichte des Unfalls Claudia Lieb

Matthieu Flonneau and Arnaud Passalacqua, Utilités de l'utilitaire. Aperçu Réaliste des Services Automobiles Donald Weber

Fred Dervin, Analysing the Consequences of Academic Mobility and Migration Anita Perkins

Regine Buschauer, Mobile Räume. Medien- und Diskursgeschichtliche Studien zur Tele-Kommunikation Monika Domman

Sébastien Gardon, Goût de bouchons. Lyon, les villes françaises et l'équation automobile Manuel Appert

Peter Adey, Aerial Life: Spaces, Mobilities, Effects Liz Millward

Rainer Ruppmann, Schrittmacher des Autobahnzeitalters: Frankfurt und das Rhein-Main-Gebiet Ueli Haefeli

Frances Steel, Oceania under Steam: Sea Transport and the Cultures of Colonialism, c. 1870-1914, Studies in Imperialism Heloise Finch-Boyer

Kelly Shannon and Marcel Smets, The Landscape of Contemporary Infrastructure Natalie Roseau

Andrew Bush, Drive Charissa Terranova

Paul M. Weyrich and William S. Lind, Moving Minds. Conservatives and Public Transportation Massimo Moraglio

Ann Johnson, Hitting the Brakes. Engineering Design and the Production of Knowledge Christopher Neumaeier

Barron H. Lerner, One for the Road: Drunk Driving Since 1900 Clay McShane

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Editorial

Penny Welch and Susan Wright

grants to pursue new research questions, undermining the key purpose of the government's academic mobility programme. In the third article, Hanne Tange investigates the role of academics in helping international students adapt to a new academic culture

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Introduction

Mobilities and Pedagogy

Sarah Gibson and Lynne Pearce

. Indeed, there has recently been a turn to mobilities within education studies that has paid attention to “student mobilities” 25 as well as the “academic mobilities” of teaching staff. 26 Mobile metaphors have also been understood as a way of

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Book Reviews

Shu-Mei Huang, Adam Kaul, and Dhan Zunino Singh

chapter by Leo Name, who explains that the academic mobility of Brazilian scholars has promoted the reception and development of the new mobility paradigm in Brazil. In addition to tourism, the field of media studies is also well represented in this