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Gabriel Remy-Handfield

, and deviant figurations. This article explores the emergence of an aesthetic of the grotesque in Lu Yang Delusional Mandala and Delusional World . I argue that this aesthetic becomes a radical tool for the artist's deconstruction and dismantling of

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Todd Berliner

Hollywood makes the most widely successful pleasure-giving artworks the world has ever known. The American film industry operates under the assumption that pleasurable aesthetic experiences, among huge populations, translate into box office

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Paisley Livingston

These brief comments focus on only one of the many strands of Murray Smith’s (2017) wide-ranging and excellent new book Film, Art, and the Third Culture , namely his discussion of aesthetic experience. Smith claims that aesthetic

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Naturalizing Aesthetic Experience

The Role of (Liberated) Embodied Simulation

Vittorio Gallese

”: Triangulation In the second chapter of his book, Smith introduces the notion of “triangulating aesthetic experience” (2017: 60). The starting point is a brave one, with which I couldn’t agree more: empirical approaches can help us to address film and art

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Todd Berliner

Aesthetic that reflects a distinct approach to film scholarship: philosophical aesthetics, psychology, reception studies, and the aesthetic analysis of Hollywood narrative and style. Each respondent has, in her or his own way, spoken to the capacities

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Patrick Keating

Todd Berliner's Hollywood Aesthetic is a major contribution to the study of Hollywood movies. While many previous critics—notably, auteur critics—have defended the artistry of selected subsets of Hollywood films, Berliner makes a compelling case

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John Powell Ward

After three decades the ‘aesthetic’ has crept back into literary studies. It is twelve years since Isobel Armstrong wrote that ‘the abandonment of the concept of literature and the category of the “aesthetic” . . . is possibly one of the greatest mistakes the left has made this decade’, and eleven since Terry Eagleton traced powerful ideas through a galaxy of philosophers of the last two centuries. Peter Brooks’s article ‘Aesthetics and Ideology: What Became of Poetics?’ appeared in 1994.

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Paul Corcoran

The concept of recognition has been employed as a term of art in sovereign diplomacy, and in a philosophical tradition ranging from Plato to Hegel as an archetype of the emergence of political association leading to ethical civil relations. Recent liberal theorists have adapted the Hegelian 'struggle for recognition' to strengthen the argument for humane respect and human rights in the modern, multicultural state. This article emphasizes the cognitive processes and perceptual capacities of recognition. Drawing on Kant and Arendt, this article argues for a broadly aesthetic view of politics as a basis for ethical and moral appraisal, and illustrates this approach with hypothetical and actual examples of politics and art.

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Mark Rollins

Book Review of Irving Massey, The Neural Imagination: Aesthetic and Neuroscientific Approaches to the Arts

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Ricardo Campos

This article is the result of research that focused on street art and graffiti in the city of Lisbon from 2004 to 2007. The empirical arguments presented draw from ethnographic work and from an analysis of inscriptions on urban walls. In my understanding, these visual manifestations can be understood as political and aesthetic devices, fundamental expressive resources in the negotiation of power and agency in the urban environment. They are vernacular creations that may be interpreted as discursive instruments forged in the context of symbolic struggles, characteristic of the 'field of visibility'. Furthermore, I put forward an analytical framework of graffiti and street art as an urban transgressive grammar, while considering the articulation of produced text and the context of production.