Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 261 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All content x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Place Making in Transit

Literary Interventions at the Airport and in the Underground

Emma Eldelin and Andreas Nyblom

features of contemporary aesthetics, art critic Nicolas Bourriaud has even suggested that airports, cars, and railroad stations be seen as new metaphors for the house—challenging traditional notions of artistic creation as a spatially secluded activity

Restricted access

Governing Global Aeromobility

Canada and Airport Refugee Claimants in the 1980s

Bret Edwards

On 1 January 1989, Chhinder Paul, a twenty-two-year-old Indian national, sought asylum in Canada at Montreal-Mirabel International Airport following an overseas flight. 1 Paul informed the Mirabel immigration officer that he was a refugee who

Restricted access

Learning from Airports' History

Nathalie Roseau

In the last two decades many researchers have taken diverse approaches to the study of airports. The airport was long considered a topic for specialists and designers, or admired as a monument celebrating the spectacle of aeromobility—from early aeronautical shows to later Sunday excursions to the huge observation terraces overlooking the airfield. Today the airport as a critical issue permeates the literature at various angles. Why such a profusion and what do these works offer the history of mobility?

Restricted access

Airports as Urban Narratives

Toward a Cultural History of the Global Infrastructures

Nathalie Roseau

This article focuses on the process of the design of airports and how in particular the urban context has shaped their specific histories. Far from being merely pure technical or functional equipment, they have been mirrors for contemporary expectations, just as they informed the modern urban imaginary. According to this perspective, an urban history of airports can be traced from the first aerodromes dedicated to large urban publics to the development of spectacular airports driven by the massive recent routinization of air transport so intricately bound up with globalization. Based on research on specific cases of the design and building of New York and Paris airports, this article aims to resist the temptations to dehistoricize the airport topic, and to introduce a narrative mode of thinking about these specific and concrete spaces.

Open access

Air Connectivity and Proximity of Large Airports as an Added Value for Museums

Lázaro Florido-Benítez

the capital cities of developed countries where large airports are localized, as well as providing a high level of connectivity in the rest of the country. Tourism is highly dependent on the aviation sector ( Florido-Benítez 2022a ; 2022b ). The World

Restricted access

How Are Aeromobilities Changing? Reviewing the Literature on European Airports

Jean-Baptiste Frétigny

Airports seem to be an endless ground for conceiving past and present (aero)-mobilities. Understood not only as air mobilities but also as the dominant mobility of international travel, aeromobilities offer an encompassing understanding of airports as sites of meaningful (im)mobilities of people, objects, ideas, and ideologies. These sites touch on more power relationships, across far larger and thinner scales of time and space, than the ones usually considered in the study of transportation places. As the first review on airport historiography in this journal showed, scholars have socially, politically, and culturally investigated airports in manifold ways, turning them into key transdisciplinary objects for the development of mobilities studies. In recent years, studies on European airports have been numerous. Few of these have engaged in deep historical analysis, although temporalities play a key role in airports. As spaces they are constantly changing, with terminals themselves being significantly more mobile than planes in terms of design and architecture. The existing literature misses links between the past and present times of airports.

Restricted access

Persistence and Disappearance of Traditional Patrilocality

Matrimonial Strategies and Postnuptial Residence Patterns in Two Eastern Siberian Communities of the Twenty-First Century

Vincent Zvénigorosky, Dariya Nikolaeva, Georgii Romanov, Aisen Solovev, Nikolai Barashkov, Éric Crubézy, Sardana Fedorova, and Christine Keyser

Situation and Ethnic Composition of Khonuu The selo of Khonuu is the administrative center of the Momsky National Nasleg in the ulus of Momsky. A small airport connects the town to Yakutsk, via a 2-hour flight, the price of which is not accessible to

Restricted access

Dimanche à Orly

The Jet-Age Airport and the Spectacle of Technology between Sky and Earth

Vanessa R. Schwartz

This article examines the second most visited site in Paris during the 1960s, behind only the Eiffel Tower, which stood outside the city's walls in Orly. The airport there, re-built in 1961 to welcome the new era of high-speed air travel in the form of jet service, featured a prominent “terrasse” where visitors paid admission to watch the jets come and go. This article examines the jet-age renovation of the airport and the wild popularity of visits there in order to consider the role of visual spectacle in advancing the culture of technological optimism of 1960s France.

Restricted access

Approaches to Waiting in Mobility Studies: Utilization, Conceptualization, Historicizing

Andrey Vozyanov

Mobility requires waiting, especially in intermodal transportation systems. People must wait in airports, stations, and vehicles; at bus stops; in queues at registration desks and luggage checks; at boarding; and elsewhere. Waiting is part of the public transportation routine. As Ohmori and Harata report, an average commute time for train commuters in Tokyo is sixty-nine minutes.

Full access

Italy and World Affairs: The Sgrena-Calipari Case

Marco Clementi

On 4 February 2005, Giuliana Sgrena, the correspondent of Il Manifesto

in Baghdad, was kidnapped by Islamic Jihad, who asked for

the withdrawal of Italian troops within 72 hours. On 4 March, Nicola

Calipari, an official of the SISMI (Military Intelligence and Security

Service) that ran the operation to liberate the Italian journalist, died

under “friendly fire” at an American checkpoint while he was accompanying

Sgrena to the Baghdad airport. On 29 April, a joint statement

was issued by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the American

State Department stating that the two countries “have not reached

shared final conclusions” as to what happened.