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Afterword

So What Is the Anthropology of Buddhism About?

David N. Gellner

It is simultaneously flattering and alarming to be represented as having written a key synthesis on the anthropology of Buddhism 27 years ago. 1 The alarm arises not just from the passage of time but mainly from the fact—pointed out by Erick White

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Introduction

Legacies, Trajectories, and Comparison in the Anthropology of Buddhism

Nicolas Sihlé and Patrice Ladwig

The Project of an ‘Anthropology of Buddhism’ To the outside observer, the anthropology of Buddhism may give the impression of having already established a lineage (see, e.g., Robbins 2007: 5 ), perhaps especially visible from the 1960s to the 1990s

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Erick White

South and Southeast Asian Theravada Buddhism guided initial work in the anthropology of Buddhism during the 1960s and 1970s, producing a variety of classic studies by anthropologists such as Gananath Obeyesekere (1963) , Melford Spiro (1970) , Stanley

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Introduction

Religions, Histories, and Comparisons

Simon Coleman, Ruy Llera Blanes, and Sondra L. Hausner

’s work invokes quite a few of Peel’s interests: literature, agency, cultural encounter, and the possibilities of optimism in human life. The special section in this volume presents a comparative anthropology of Buddhism that exemplifies one of the

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Belonging in a New Myanmar

Identity, Law, and Gender in the Anthropology of Contemporary Buddhism

Juliane Schober

, national, or cultural values. Pointing to the complex challenges people in Myanmar are facing, I also aim to illustrate how an anthropology of Buddhism can account for the agency of ethnic and religious others living in contemporary Theravada contexts

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Portrait

Talal Asad

Talal Asad, Jonathan Boyarin, Nadia Fadil, Hussein Ali Agrama, Donovan O. Schaefer, and Ananda Abeysekara

for its time, demonstrated that the anthropology of Buddhism that had explained Buddhist practices like yaktovil in terms of symbolic expressions had ignored the relation between power and authority. Because of its inattention to power, Scott argued