Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 144 items for :

  • "anti-semitism" x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

'Heritage Anti-Semitism' in Modern Times?

Representations of Jews and Judaism in Twenty-First-Century British Historical Fiction for Children

Madelyn Travis

Beginning in the 1960s, British children's literature began to include sympathetic representations of people from outside the dominant culture. Greater numbers of Jewish characters appeared as part of this trend. In the succeeding decades, the British publishing industry has continued to encourage cultural sensitivity in children's books, but this article argues that, despite this, in the twenty-first century constructions of Jews and Judaism increasingly resemble the stereotypical images common in works from previous eras. The paper goes on to contend that although these stereotypes were acknowledged and challenged in historical fiction for children of the 1960s and 1970s in order to promote tolerance, authorial intent in employing such images in more recent historical novels is often unclear, and as a result the texts convey ambivalent messages to today's young readers about the place of Jews in British society.

Restricted access

William D. Irvine

Scholars of Third Republic France have long assumed that the political spectrum was divided into a readily identifiable Right and Left, adhering to mutually exclusive positions. But this comfortable political taxonomy could, at times, to violence to political reality. The Right could at some periods in the history of the Third Republic be aggressively nationalistic; at other times it could be positively irenic. The Left was often pacifist, but not always and there were moments when it, or some fraction of it, could be quite bellicose. Neither anti-Semitism nor racism in general were the exclusive province of the Right. On critical issues, the Left could be more refractory to women's rights than was the Right. French fascism claimed to be neither right nor left and at least some French fascist movements could list as many former members of the Left among its leaders as former members of the Right.

Restricted access

Parasites from all Civilizations

The Croix de Feu/Parti Social Français Confronts French Jewry, 1931-1939

Samuel Kalman

Refuting claims made by several historians that the Croix de Feu/Parti social français were non-exclusionary, this article demonstrates the prevalence of anti-Semitism and xenophobia throughout the league's metropolitan and Algerian sections. CDF/PSF leadership and rank-and-file alike prioritized the notion of the enemy, and their plans for les exclus augured similar developments under the Vichy regime. Although less rabidly xenophobic than his colleagues, whose opinions variously promoted denaturalization and outright elimination, group leader Colonel Françaois de la Rocque was nonetheless prone to racist and exclusionary doctrine, arguing that foreign Jews and immigrants were the enemies of la patrie, and should necessarily be expunged from the new nation. The article describes the wide range of xenophobia present in group actions and discourse, while positioning the CDF/PSF within the broader context of French and Algerian society.

Restricted access

Maria Vassilikou

In August 1946, the Board of Deputies of British Jews received a report about the situation of the Jewish cemetery of Salonika, the city which only three years ago had witnessed the destruction by the Germans of one of the most glorious Jewish communities of the Balkans. This detailed report aimed at summoning support for the protection of what was left of the ancient Jewish burial ground.

Restricted access

The Gifts and the Calling of God are Irrevocable

Commission for Religious Relationships with the Jews

Henry Wansbrough

outline the document, introducing it with a sketch of the background that made it necessary, namely the institutional anti-Semitism of the Christian centuries, and ending with a brief discussion of the point that seem to me most important and controversial

Restricted access

Jonathan Magonet

associations that can address more broadly pressing problems of contemporary Jewish identity and inclusiveness and the need for mutual support in the face of growing anti-Semitism, as well as contributing a distinctive Jewish voice to wider society issues. The

Restricted access

Stephen Berkowitz

emigrated to Israel. Last year the number rose to more than 7,300. Still others, of unknown number, are leaving France for the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. 19 One of the major factors provoking this surge in emigration is anti-Semitism. Jews

Restricted access

Julie Fette

the metropolitan trente glorieuses and became professionals in the United States and the Netherlands. Marcelle and Pinhas know intimately several major circumstances of the twentieth century: Jewish Morocco; French colonial Maghreb; Vichy anti-Semitism

Restricted access

Liberal Whispers and Propaganda Fears

The American Jewish Committee and Israel’s Palestinian Minority, 1948–1966

Geoffrey P. Levin

anti-Semites, the American Friends of the Middle East (AFME), and various Arab states. 13 The report claimed that the Arab League, the head of this network, aimed to foment anti-Semitism. It noted pamphlets issued by the Egyptian embassy containing

Restricted access

Michael B. Loughlin

“successes” of foreign fascism in Italy and Germany but in a French manner, “without castor oil or anti-Semitism.” Responding to threats from Nazi Germany and the Popular Front in 1935 and 1936, Hervé campaigned to draft the “hero of Verdun,” Philippe Pétain