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Architectures of Appropriation

Salvage, Repatriation, and the Politics of Jean Prouvé's Maisons Tropicales

Leonie Treier

implement them on a larger scale (for a careful description and analysis of the design and its various elements, see Huppatz 2010 ). Moreover, this appropriation of anthropological discourse demonstrates an absence of scrutiny on the side of current Euro

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Susan Abulhawa's Appropriation of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

Yousef Abu Amrieh

final love story that the novel depicts is that of Nur and Jamal. This relationship is not ruined directly by war, but Jamal chooses to leave Gaza for a better life in Canada. Appropriating Shakespeare Julie Sanders argues that ‘in appropriations

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Fidelity versus Appropriation in Comics Adaptation

Jacques Carelman's and Clément Oubrerie's Zazie dans le métro

Armelle Blin-Rolland

Raymond Queneau's 1959 novel Zazie dans le métro has been adapted into two text/image versions, by Jacques Carelman in 1966 and by Clément Oubrerie in 2008. Carelman's version is strongly inscribed in the fidelity discourse, while Oubrerie advocates a process of complete appropriation of the source text by the adapter. This article will explore how the three interrelated aspects of approach to adaptation, text/image combination and readership and reader's experience, shape the transposition of the source text into two strikingly different text/image versions by Carelman and Oubrerie. Focusing on the transposition of the literary voices of the source text, it will discuss the differing manners in which the adapters use the specificity of their chosen medium to make the characters of Zazie dans le métro speak in text and image to their new readers.

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Reworking Appropriation

The Language of Paris Railways, 1870–1914

Peter Soppelsa

By tracking railway language through periodicals and poetry, this article examines the words and images used to make sense of Paris's new subway and streetcars between 1870 and 1914. It proposes a new threefold approach to understanding the appropriation of technology, which reworks its agents, sites, and chronologies. It maintains that appropriation takes both material and symbolic forms, and that appropriation processes transform both appropriated objects and their cultural contexts. Language anchors appropriation as it operates through circulating texts. For Paris, railways were both transportation technologies and versatile tools for making meaning. Railways set spaces, customs, identities, and images adrift, which traditionalists found threatening, progressives found promising, and avant-gardists found inspiring. Fitting Paris with railways required both reimagining and rebuilding the city, and reshaping what railways could be. The article concludes that appropriation is neither linear nor complete, but rather an ongoing and unfinished negotiation of the meaning of technologies.

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Bringing Lebanon’s Civil War Home to Anglophone Literature

Alameddine’s Appropriation of Shakespeare’s Tragedies

Yousef Awad

’s borrowings from Shakespeare are not limited to direct quotations. They include adaptations of particular scenes or appropriations of Shakespearean themes, explicitly alluding to or carrying traces of Shakespeare’s plays. Alameddine models Aaliya after Lady

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‘|Y]oung Hamlet’

Shakespeare for Swedish Children

Mette Hildeman Sjölin

Shakespeare for the very young. When I explain the phenomenon of Shakespeare adaptations and appropriations to students or the general public, the example that most people tend to be familiar with is The Lion King , widely considered an adaptation of Hamlet

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‘Shakespeare Had the Passion of an Arab’

The Appropriation of Shakespeare in Fadia Faqir’s Willow Trees Don’t Weep

Hussein A. Alhawamdeh

This article traces William Shakespeare’s echo in Willow Trees Don’t Weep (2014) by Fadia Faqir, a Jordanian/British novelist, to examine the function of Faqir’s appropriation of Shakespeare’s Othello (1604) and Cymbeline (1611) in

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Women and children together and apart

Finding the time for social reproduction theory

Jan Newberry and Rachel Rosen

again insights from Marxist feminist scholars about the gendered and racialized character of this labor and its appropriation. We recognize that women and children's everyday lives are often entangled through this labor and its expectation, even as we

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The Mobilization of Appropriation

Comment on the Special Section on Cultural Appropriation

Carsten Schinko

“Appropriation“ is a complex term used in many different realms, and an almost ubiquitous phenomenon. Conceptually linked to questions of mobility, appropriation has both a social and physical dimension. This essay delineates the term's employment in key political and academic discourses, and interrogates its inherent logic with regard to possession, the attribution of purpose and value, and the social reciprocity of the parties involved in the act. Starting off with questions of just distribution in modern nation-states, the argument then traces appropriation in contemporary debates on copyright in a digital age, and provides a sketch of the larger political imaginary informing acts of appropriation.

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Migration, Transfer and Appropriation

German Pork Butchers in Britain

Margrit Schulte Beerbühl

Today foreign restaurants and food shops shape the culinary landscape of Britain. While the impact of post-war migration on the traditional eating habits of the British population has received some attention in historical research, the influence of former waves of immigrants has hardly been studied. This paper focuses on the immigration of German pork butchers and their contribution to the development of meat consumption in Britain. By looking at the pattern of migration it will be shown that migrants created geographically widespread networks in Britain. Within these networks they transferred skills, know-how and social capital. Through a complex process of adaptation and appropriation German sausages were incorporated into the British diet. This process involved natives as well as immigrants. The former had to overcome established food habits while the latter had to adapt their recipes to local taste preferences.