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Michael D. Picone

Initially, being mass produced and sequential, comic art was excluded from fine art museums. Some comics artists themselves have expressed ambivalence about the value of inclusion (but counter-arguments are proposed, challenging the perception of incompatibility). However, a pivotal element in the break from the ranks of artistic modernism has been the appropriation of comic art motifs for use in museum-grade pop art, figuration narrative and their successors. In counterpoint, comic art is replete with examples of museum art being appropriated in order to obtain diegetic enrichment of various sorts, either for the purpose of parody or in relation to plot construction. Against this backdrop, and abetted by the twin challenge that art museums are facing to remain relevant and to increase revenue, a game-changing development is afoot, leading to a co-operative re-positioning of art museums and comics artists. With the Louvre taking the lead, many art museums in France and Italy are now commissioning works of comic art based on the museum's own collections, often launched with companion exhibits. The resultant 'art within art' lends itself readily to rich experimentation with themes incorporating intertextuality and parallel narrative.

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Mor Cohen

In 1992, Sarah Breitberg-Semel spoke of the inability of a political avantgarde to take root in Israel: “The political avant-garde [art] in the country has never been able to gain traction. Its principles, its political background, were not clear to

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Pogo, Pop and Politics

Robert Benayoun on Comics and Roy Lichtenstein

Gavin Parkinson

constitute collectively the closest thing to a group position on comics from within surrealism. 19 Surrealism, Comics and Pop Art Benayoun wrote on surrealist art and was a private artist and more public collagist, showing in surrealist journals and

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Hollie MacKenzie and Iain MacKanzie

In this article we focus on the potential for an alignment of certain feminist artistic practices and poststructuralist conceptions of critique that may enable ways of theorizing practices of resistance and engender ways of practicing resistance in theory, without the lurch back into masculinist forms of dogmatism. It will be claimed that an ontological conception of art, considered as that which makes a difference in the world, can not only challenge the primacy of the dogmatic and masculine ‘subject who judges’, but also instill ways of thinking about, and ways of enacting, feminist artistic encounters with the capacity to resist dogmatism. The theoretical stakes of this claim are elaborated through complimentary readings of Deleuze and Guattari’s constructivist account of philosophy and Irigaray’s feminist explorations of what it means to think from within the 'labial', rather than from the position of the dominant phallic symbolic order. We argue that this creative conjunction between Irigaray, Deleuze, and Guattari provides the resources for a conceptualisation of both feminist artistic practice and the critical practice of poststructuralist philosophy as forms of resistance to the dominant patriarchal order, in ways that can avoid the collapse back into masculinist forms of dogmatism. Revel’s discussion of the role of constituent rather than constituted forms of resistance is employed to draw out the implications of this position for contentious politics. It is concluded that constituent practices of resistance can be understood as a challenge to the phallogocentric symbolic order to the extent that they are practices of a labial art-politics.

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“They don’t even know how to copy”

The discourse on originality in Albania’s art world

Sofia Kalo

semistructured interviews with art producers. 1 On that rainy day in October 2010, I joined the staff of Art Kontakt, a Tirana-based art organization, to help proofread a grant proposal. We had just settled down when a staff member, a woman in her late 20s

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“For a Martyr from Afar”

A Response to Laila Soliman’s No Time for Art

Caroline Rooney

There have been many debates over the question of whether creative works that are produced as acts of commitment to social justice and liberation struggles truly count as works of art. The concern is often that protest or rights-based art lacks

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Hubert I. Cohen

Review of András Bálint Kovács, SCREENING MODERNISM: EUROPEAN ART CINEMA, 1950–1980

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Antonio Lázaro-Reboll

, reflected on the diverse impetuses propelling European comics criticism forward from art history to didactics to semiology. 7 When the pop culture critic Terenci Moix turned to comics in Los ‘comics’: Arte para el consumo y formas ‘pop’ , he read camp and

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Sensory Perception of Rock Art in East Siberia and the Far East

Soviet Archeological “Discoveries” and Indigenous Evenkis

Donatas Brandišauskas

Everyone who had ever had a chance to be in places outlined in the monograph knows, what kind of strength, dedication and desire to overcome one's limitations a person needs just to see these monuments [rock art] since the location of them often are

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David Art

abandoned. Notes 1 See David Art, “The Containment of the Radical Right in Europe,” Ethnic and Racial Studies 38, no. 8 (2015): 1347–1354. 2 John Lewis Gaddis, Strategies of Containment (New York, 1982). 3 Sean Hanley, “The Czech Republicans 1990–1998: A