Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 202 items for :

  • "asylum seeker" x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Barak Kalir

Thousands of asylum seekers annually apply for protection from the Dutch state. The number of asylum applicants fluctuates across time and ranges from 50,000 per annum in the early 1990s, in the midst of the Balkan wars, to around 10,000 to 15

Free access

Kingsley Garbett

On 4 July 2003, a one-day “Cultural Research and Refugee Studies” workshop was held in Sydney. Greg Gow and Amanda Wise organized the workshop, a cooperative venture between the cultural research centers of the University of Western Sydney and the Australian National University. It brought together a large group of researchers, practitioners, and community representatives to exchange ideas about cultural research among refugees and asylum seekers in Australia. The three articles that follow, by Gow, Wise, and Glazebrook, present a particular perspective on the methodology of studying and analyzing refugee behavior in Cultural Studies, stressing the significance of considering the emotive and affective aspects of their status and position. Wise’s material considers East Timorese refugees, many of whom now have residence in Australia, while Gow and Glazebrook examine more recent refugees and asylum seekers from Iraq and Central Afghanistan, respectively, many of whom still have uncertain futures. Comments from a panel discussion by Khalid Koser, Pnina Werbner, and Ien Ang complete this thematic section.

Restricted access

Over Under Sideways Down

An Interview with Karrie Fransman

Ann Miller

In this interview Karrie Fransman discusses some of the aesthetic choices that she made in creating her comic book Over Under Sideways Down, the story of a young asylum seeker, which deals with a series of harrowing events: exile, journey and displacement, and then the struggle to attain the right to remain in the UK. Fransman considers the ethical and artistic issues raised by the telling of Ebrahim's story, which includes episodes of pain and loss and which, moreover, he had already recounted many times over to disbelieving interviewers, who had the power to grant or refuse him refugee status. Fransman expresses her pleasure in discovering that the rendering of his story into comics form has helped Ebrahim to feel that he has gained control over it. She reflects on the process of condensing the narrative and heightening key moments, her concern to avoid turning violence into spectacle, and her use of resources of the medium, such as symbolism and metonymy, to convey the intensity of emotion.

Restricted access

Governing through Uncertainty

Experiences of Being a Refugee in Turkey as a Country for Temporary Asylum

Kristen Sarah Biehl

This article addresses the question of how to theorize the relation between uncertainty and governmentality with regard to displacement and its consequences. It explores the experiences of asylum seekers in Turkey and the bureaucratic processes of refugee status determination, local dispersal, and third country resettlement, illustrating two main points throughout. First, 'protracted uncertainty', characterized by indefinite waiting, limited knowledge, and unpredictable legal status, is a central element of the experience of being an asylum seeker in Turkey. Second, this uncertainty serves to demobilize, contain, and criminalize asylum seekers through the production of protracted uncertainty, which in turn is normalized as a necessity of bureaucracy and/or security. The article invites readers to question the governmentalities of asylum and border regimes that not only discipline refugees' everyday movements but also determine the uncertainty of 'refugeeness'.

Free access

Re/Making Immigration Policy through Practice

How Social Workers Influence What It Means to Be a Refused Asylum Seeker

Kathryn Tomko Dennler

Upon the UK Border Agency’s (UKBA’s) 1 refusal of an asylum claim, the offer of temporary, state-sanctioned hospitality is revoked, leaving non-detained refused asylum seekers to navigate a complex landscape of hostility, disinterest

Restricted access

Roger Karapin

Many writers have argued that anti-immigration politics in Germany

and other West European countries have been driven by radical-right

parties or the electoral maneuvering of national politicians

from established parties. Others have argued that waves of violence

against immigrants and ethnic minorities have spurred anti-immigration

politics, or that racist ideologies and socioeconomic inequality

are the root causes. By comparison, authors have paid relatively little

attention to anti-immigration mobilization at subnational levels,

including the public positions taken by subnational politicians and

the activities of movement groups, or “challengers.” Nonetheless,

research has shown that subnational politicians are often important

in pressing national campaigns for immigration controls. Moreover,

as I have argued elsewhere, anti-immigration politicians in Britain

and Germany have responded in large part to local challengers, who

were aided by political elites at local and regional levels.

Open access

Struggling for home where home is not meant to be

A study of asylum seekers in reception centers in Norway

Anne Sigfrid Grønseth and Ragne Øwre Thorshaug

The basis for this article is an interdisciplinary research project entitled What Buildings Do (2012–2018), which aimed to document and explore the effects of physical surroundings on the well-being and quality of life of asylum seekers in Norway

Open access

Freedom, Salvation, Redemption

Theologies of Political Asylum

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd

terms of sincerity, the “eye of the persecutor,” the First Amendment, or some other definition or metric, obscures a broader field of theological politics of asylum seeking and claiming. To explore that field requires looking beyond the category of

Restricted access

Home Away from Home

Ethnography of an EU Erasmus+ Project

Terry Lamb and Danila Mayer

the past few years, feelings within the EU towards migration have become increasingly negative. The challenge of facilitating the inclusion of a growing number of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees and enhancing their participation in the new

Free access

Refugee Hospitality Encounters in Northern Portugal

“Cultural Orientations” and “Contextual Protection”

Elizabeth Challinor

state discourse of the worthy guest, reproduced by volunteers in the camp, depoliticized asylum seekers, limiting their agency, by representing them as apolitical beings in need who should comply with the rules of hospitality. Asylum seekers are