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Automobility and Oil Vulnerability

Unfairness as Critical to Energy Transitions

Ana Horta

societies, and some, such as automobility, correspond to complex sociotechnical systems and practices with countless implications. It is unclear how these can be changed, and the uncertainties involved in such processes of transitioning require attention to

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Media Ecologies of Autonomous Automobility

Gendered and Racial Dimensions of Future Concept Cars

Julia M. Hildebrand and Mimi Sheller

,” potentially distributing and organizing mobilities in new ways, or as dystopias of malfunctioning technology. 4 The suggested “new automobile paradigm” significantly affects not only the act of driving but also our “aesthetic, emotional and sensory responses

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Automobiles and Socioeconomic Sustainability

Do We Need a Mobility Bill of Rights?

Daniel Newman

Cars define the modern age, and there are few more powerful signifiers of contemporary consumer capitalism than private automobility. The presumption for vehicle ownership is writ through twenty-first century life to the extent that there are

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From the Auto-mobile to the Driven Subject?

Discursive Assertions of Mobility Futures

Katharina Manderscheid

Automobility has been identified as a fundamental element of modern Western socialities and corresponding identities, deeply interwoven with power relations and social inequalities. 1 By this token, social science literature has repeatedly

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Le Rallye Méditerranée-le Cap

Racing towards Eurafrica?

Megan Brown

sent relevant travel information to information-seekers, a common function of automobile clubs in the early-to-mid twentieth century. 11 Its motto was: “Eurafrica is the last chance for Europe and the first for Africa.” 12 As European states

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Revisiting “Driving While Black”: Racialized Automobilities in a Settler Colonial Context

Georgine Clarsen

Paul Gilroy observed in 2001 that there were “surprisingly few” discussions of automobiles in histories of African American vernacular cultures, in spite of their “epoch-making impact.” He argued that a “ distinctive history of propertylessness and material deprivation” had led to a disproportionate African American investment in automobiles. This article considers how car culture has also operated as a salve for the “indignities of white supremacy” for Indigenous Australians, though on very different terms.

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L'art de l'automobile, chefs-d'œuvre de la collection Ralph Lauren

Paul Smith

Collecting old cars, like a cocaine habit, seems to be one of nature’s ways of telling you you are making too much money. Think of Pink Floyd’s drummer Nick Mason and his private collection of Ferraris. Think of the American pharmaceutical heir Josiah K. Lilly III and his vintage automobiles displayed in an imitation Shaker barn-house at a heritage park on Cape Cod. Or remember Hans and Fritz Schlumpf, Alsatian textile magnates unable to resist another Bugatti. Indeed, the brothers’ passion helped lead their firm into bankruptcy and their collection––more than 500 vehicles, including 150 Bugattis––ended up as France’s national motorcar museum, the Cité de l’Automobile, opened at Mulhouse in 1982.

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"My Sewer": James J. Flink on His Career Interpreting the Role of the Automobile in Twentieth-century Culture

Greg Thompson

James J. Flink “has clearly established himself as the leading authority on the history of the automobile and has written a major work that will repay careful study by all scholars interested in the 20th century,” wrote cultural historian Joseph J. Corn in 1989 in a review of The Automobile Age. Corn did not write “transportation scholars” but “all scholars,” and was alluding to Flink’s approach to periodizing history around progressive technological change rather than around political administrations or wars. Corn continued, “[Flink] views the car, or more accurately automobility, as being a major protagonist in the historical dramas of the period,” quoting passages that pinned the Great Depression on the saturation of the automobile market and attributed the allies’ triumph in the Second World War to superior mass-production capability stemming from the American automobile industry. Corn also observed, “Flink significantly demolished the myth, repeated by too many historians, that the American experience with automobiles has been exceptional .... Moreover, he concludes, the ‘appeals of the car were universal, not culturally determined’ (pp. 28–29).” Flink published at least two more important articles and was writing his fourth book on the automobile when he retired from his professorship in Comparative Culture at the University of California at Irvine in 1994. Since then, he eschewed academic and professional activity, despite numerous entreaties. However, when I, a former student of Flink’s and now a transportation planning professor, asked him to reflect on his influential career, Flink welcomed the opportunity. I traveled to Professor Flink’s southern California home in March 2012 for the interview, which took place on March 2.2

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Getting Behind the Object We Love the Most

Cars: Accelerating the Modern World Victoria and Albert Museum

Robert Braun and Richard Randell

Victoria and Albert Museum 23 November 2019-19 April 2020 https://www.vam.ac.uk/exhibitions/cars Recounted through artifacts, primarily automobiles, but also photographs, video, text, and automobile related installations, Cars: Accelerating

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Book Reviews

Daniela Atanasova, Johannes Starkbaum, and Anna Gerhardus

and Natan Sznaider, “Unpacking Cosmopolitanism for the Social Sciences: A Research Agenda,” British Journal of Sociology 57, no. 1 (2006): 1–23, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-4446.2006.00091.x . The Destruction of Automobility as We Know It