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Freedom, Autonomy, and (Inter)dependency

Feminist Dialogues and Republican Debates on Democracy

Ailynn Torres Santana

politics has de facto metabolised the republican calls for freedom and against dispossession. In parallel, I affirm that feminist debates on care and interdependence could strain the republican emphasis on autonomy. Republicanism, ‘Women's Issues

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Time, Age and Autonomy

Jan Baars

This article concentrates on the concepts of time that are implied in the study of ageing. As such, it does not directly address the complex issue of autonomy and ageing, but is an attempt to prepare the ground for a more fundamental approach to ageing than is usually the case. Instead of assuming that we know what age is, I intend to think a little more about the concepts of time that are presupposed in speaking about age and ageing. Usually these concepts are approached from a chronological time perspective, which is only one, albeit important, approach to time. Another perspective which is crucial for understanding human ageing is subjective, personally experienced time. These perspectives are not by definition in harmony with each other. Subjective perspectives on time and ageing can conflict with objectifying, chronological perspectives. Human ageing means living in dimensions of time where impersonal forces and regularities clash with personal meanings.

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The movement for Siberian regional and national autonomy in the early 1920s

Dina A. Amanzholova

This article examines the movement for the achievement of national and regional autonomy for the indigenous peoples of Siberia. Concentrating on East Siberia, the author discusses the various conflicts between advocates of autonomy - political, territorial and cultural - in the region, and the various warring factions during the Revolution, Civil War and the early 1920s. She demonstrates how the native peoples did not necessarily understand the political ambitions of the leaders and politicians. She also demonstrates how difficult it was for the general principle of national self-determination to be achieved with so many conflicting interests during a period of nation-wide upheaval and civil war. Underlying this were also the perennial contradictions between the political aims of the centre and the local interests of the outlying regions and peoples. In conclusion, the author suggests that many of the problems of Siberian autonomous movements in the early twentieth century re-appeared at its end.

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Zapatista autonomy and the making of alter-native politics

Views from its day-to-day praxis

Sabrina Melenotte

Since 1994, the Zapatista political autonomy project has been claiming that “another world is possible”. This experience has influenced many intellectuals of contemporary radical social movements who see in the indigenous organization a new political alter-native. I will first explore some of the current theories on Zapatism and the crossing of some of authors into anarchist thought. The second part of the article draws on an ethnography conducted in the municipality of Chenalhó, in the highlands of Chiapas, to emphasize some of the everyday practices inside the self-proclaimed “autonomous municipality” of Polhó. As opposed to irenic theories on Zapatism, this article describes a peculiar process of autonomy and brings out some contradictions between the political discourse and the day-to-day practices of the autonomous power, focusing on three specific points linked to economic and political constraints in a context of political violence: the economic dependency on humanitarian aid and the “bureaucratic habitus”; the new “autonomous” leadership it involved, between “good government” and “good management”; and the internal divisions due to the return of some displaced members and the exit of international aid.

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Autonomy and the Spaciousness of the Social in Denmark

The Conflict Between Ungdomshuset and Faderhuset

Stine Krøijer and Inger Sjørslev

This article is concerned with the idea of societal 'spaciousness' and its relationship to individual and collective autonomy. These issues are analyzed in the context of the eviction of a self-managed social center of left-radical activists in Copenhagen and the protests and public debate that followed. The authors find that societal spaciousness in Denmark is metaphorically associated with a house or a limited physical space. People should limit themselves in public space, as in a house, to 'make room' for all. Because youngsters are not conceived of as fully fledged political subjects who are able to conduct themselves appropriately in public space, they become a group of special concern. The authors argue that space should be conceived as a dimension of social relations, and that sociality relies on a temporal assemblage of people, things, and imaginaries with space.

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Theorizing Relations in Indigenous South America

Marcelo González Gálvez, Piergiorgio Di Giminiani, and Giovanna Bacchiddu

, which we call ‘dependence on otherness’, and a set of norms and practices, which we refer to as an ‘ethics of autonomy’. As argued by Overing (2003: 306) , in indigenous South America, autonomy—rather than its impossibility—tends to figure as both the

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An Indochinese Dominion

L'Effort indochinois and Autonomy in a Global Context, 1936–1939

M. Kathryn Edwards

autonomy and dominion. 1 Contrary to the newspaper's claims, the autonomist trend was not entirely new; it had existed in various iterations since World War I. What was new was the context in which autonomy was being debated. The advent of the Popular

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Toward a Postimperial Order?

The Sakha Intellectuals and the Revolutionary Transformations in Late Imperial Russia, 1905–1917

Aleksandr Korobeinikov and Egor Antonov

, autonomy implied granting authority to national representatives of the region. It, in turn, meant that the titular nation a priori received more political, social, cultural, and other rights compared to other national or ethnic groups in the region ( Smith

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Critiquing Sub-Saharan Pan-Africanism through an Appraisal of Postcolonial African Modernity

Lawrence Ogbo Ugwuanyi

) outline a proposal that will provide an alternative solution. This proposal, which the article calls pro-Africanism, supports the view that autonomy and self-will are two cardinal principles that are fundamental to African self-definition and that any

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Individual Autonomy and Global Democracy

Michael Pendlebury

In this schematic article I adumbrate an approach to normative political theory that is based on the idea that individual autonomy is a fundamental political value (Section I) and draw out some important consequences of the approach for the global political order (Section II).