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John Moores

The German journal London und Paris called James Gillray 'the foremost living artist in his genre, not only amongst Englishmen, but amongst all European nations'. Despite the scholarly attention he has attracted, many of Gillray's individual works have yet to receive rigorous analysis. One such neglected print is National Conveniences (1796), assumed to be a crude, straightforward expression of national supremacy. However, a closer reading shows Gillray employing the ideas of Jean-Jacques Rousseau both to undermine notions of English superiority and to assail a particular personal adversary. With this reading in mind, we can reassess references to Rousseau in Gillray's other prints, and propose a new direction from which to approach his greater oeuvre.

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Mike Keating, Cathal O'Siochru, and Sal Watt

This article describes a C-SAP-funded project evaluating the introduction of a new tutorial programme for first year Sociology students, which sought to integrate a 'skills framework' to enable students to develop a range of academic skills alongside their study of the subject.

The pegagogical and institutional background to the decision to adopt this 'integrated' approach is summarised and the staff and student experiences are then evaluated using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Primarily concerned with evaluating staff and student responses to the new programme, this paper also raises some issues with regard to the methodologies of evaluation.

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Editorial

Food security, technology, and the global commons—'New' political dilemmas?

Monique Nuijten

While in many places of the world people are starving from hunger, in other regions we are deeply concerned with the quality of our abundant food. The mad cow disease that broke out some years ago in the UK was a reason for many people to stop eating beef or meat altogether— especially after several dreadful documentaries of patients with the Creutzfeldt-Jakob syndrome, the human variety of the mad cow disease.

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Renata Lizzi

In Italy, the ‘mad cow’ emergency lasted precisely a year. It began

in November 2000 subsequent to the eruption of the crisis in

France1 and the measures announced by European authorities,

when the Italian government adopted a series of urgent health and

trade provisions. It ended in autumn 2001 when health controls

and market measures for the beef sector, as well as the opinions

of experts and scientists, gave credible guarantees on the safety

of meat and thus facilitated the recommencement of consumption

and the productive and commercial cycle of the sector.

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Paul Apostolidis

This essay considers whether legal rights remain a core resource for transforming the social situation of low-income workers in the United States. In particular, how does the recent expansion of the immigrant workforce in the US affect the prospects for workers to generate a symbiosis between legalist struggles and rank-and-file movement activism? I demonstrate that the migration narratives of Mexican immigrant union activists intervene in the law's formation of political subjects, such that the thorough disciplining of a docile subject by the law does not necessarily result from legalist activism. Instead, migration stories furnish alternative sources of identity that can mitigate these effects and spur the translation of legalist struggle into radical-democratic unionism. My analysis is based on interviews with immigrant workers who led a highly unusual movement of resistance from 1995-2005 at a large beef processing plant in Washington State.

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What Really Matters in Creating Mass Mobilization, Classical Organization, or New Social Media?

A Comparative Case Study of the Mass Mobilization Process in France and South Korea

Jeong-Im Hyun

This article explores why people adopt different processes to participate in mass mobilizations, using the 2006 Anti-CPE (labor law) Movement in France and the 2008 Candlelight Movement against American Beef Imports in South Korea as case studies. In France, initiators and participants followed the ‘ready-made’ way: left-wing organizations led the whole process of mass mobilizations. In contrast, in South Korea, initiators came from ‘nowhere’: they were middle and high school students without any political organizations; participants were ‘tainted’ by the left-wing political line. The key finding of this study is that the levels of demarcation of political lines in people’s everyday life may explain this difference. In France, strong establishment of a political line in people’s everyday life brought fewer new actors, creating less surprise but a solid mobilization; in South Koreas, the less-established political line in people’s everyday life attracted more new actors, creating more surprise but ‘frivolous’ mobilizations.

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Ariela Zycherman

lauded when rates drop and blamed when rates increase. For example, Philip M. Fearnside (2015 ) has argued that these recent spikes in deforestation come from the decline in value of the Brazilian real, increased global prices of beef and soy, and the

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Christian Bromberger

stews, including fesenjân rashti. Source: Christian Bromberger, Spring 2002. Another feature contrasts traditional food regime in Gilân and in inner Iran: Gilânis are fond of beef, an original feature until the last decades that struck most

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Harvey's 1593 ‘To Be and Not To Be’

The Authorship and Date of the First Quarto of Hamlet

Dennis McCarthy

right’, Jonson probably took his cue from the not-without-mustard scene in The Taming of the Shrew , in which Grumio, attempting to starve Katherine, refuses to serve her beef without mustard: Grumio What say you to a piece of beef and

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From Urban Agriculture to Urban Food

Food System Analysis Based on Interaction Between Research, Policy, and Society

Heidrun Moschitz, Jan Landert, Christian Schader, and Rebekka Frick

what share of the food that is consumed in Basel is produced regionally. The definition of “region” in this study encompassed the cantons of Basel City, Basel District, Aargau, and Solothurn. The products analyzed included apples, carrots, milk, beef