Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 32 items for :

  • "border patrol" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Extraterritorial migration control in Malaysia

Militarized, externalized, and regionalized

Choo Chin Low

English abstract: This article examines how migration control in Malaysia has been transformed in response to non-traditional security threats. Since the 2010s, the state has expanded the territorial reach of its immigration enforcement through trilateral border patrol initiatives and multilateral defense establishments. Malaysia’s extraterritorial policy is mostly implemented through the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) frameworks. Common geopolitical security concerns, particularly the transnational crime and terrorism confronted by Malaysia and its bordering countries, have led to extraterritorial control measures to secure its external borders. Key elements include the growing involvement of the army, the institutionalization of border externalization, and the strengthening of the ASEAN’s regional immigration cooperation. By analyzing the ASEAN’s intergovernmental collaboration, this article demonstrates that Malaysia’s extraterritorial migration practices are militarized, externalized, and regionalized.

Spanish abstract: Este artículo examina la transformación del control migratorio en Malasia en respuesta a las amenazas de seguridad no tradicionales. Desde 2010, el estado aumentó el alcance territorial de su control migratorio a través de patrullas fronterizas trilaterales y establecimiento de defensa multilateral. La política extraterritorial de Malasia tiene como marco principal la Asociación de Naciones del Sureste Asiático (ASEAN en inglés). Las preocupaciones de seguridad geopolítica comunes, particularmente los delitos y el terrorismo transnacional, provocaron medidas de control extraterritorial para asegurar sus fronteras externas. Los elementos clave son la creciente implicación del ejército, la institucionalización de la externalización de fronteras y el fortalecimiento de la cooperación regional en inmigración de ASEAN. Este artículo demuestra que las prácticas migratorias extraterritoriales de Malasia están militarizadas, externalizadas y regionalizadas.

French abstract: L’article analyse les changements apportés aux services de con trôle de la migration en Malaisie. Depuis 2010, l’État a étendu son champ d’action et mis en place des initiatives de patrouilles frontalières trilatérales, de défense multilatérale et une police extraterritoriale déployée sous l’impulsion de l’Association des nations de l’Asie du Sud-Est (ANASE). Les problèmes de sécurité géopolitique, comme la criminalité transnationale et le terrorisme qui sévissent en Malaisie et dans les pays voisins, ont donné lieu à des mesures extraterritoriales pour sécuriser les frontières extérieures. Parmi elles, figurent l’implication de l’armée, l’externalisation institutionnalisée du contrôle aux frontières et le renforcement de la coopération de l’ANASE en matière d’immigration. Par l’analyse de cette coopération intergouvernementale, cet article démontre que la politique migratoire malaisienne est régie par la militarisation, l’externalisation et la régionalisation.

Restricted access

"Pseudo-Sousveillance"

(Re)imagining Immigration Narratives and Surveillance Practices by Experiencing "Use of Force"

Kellie Marin

This article introduces the concept of “pseudo-sousveillance” as simulated sousveillance practices created by the sensory environments of immersive technologies. To advance this concept, I analyze the virtual reality (VR) experience “Use of Force” that immerses participants within the scene of the night during which immigrant Anastasio Hernandez Rojas was beaten by border patrol officers at the San Ysidro Port of Entry. I argue that the pseudo-sousveillance practices of cellphone recording and surveillance from above enlist users to be active participants in resisting dominant surveillance practices by constructing alternative narratives about immigrant experiences, exposing the overreach of the border patrol, and revealing the limits of surveillance in immigration control. I then discuss the implications that pseudo-sousveillance has for rethinking the rhetorical power of emerging technologies and sousveillance in a surveillant age.

Full access

Anna Caffarena

In the early morning of 12 July 2006, Lebanese Hezbollah guerrillas

kidnapped two Israeli soldiers on border patrol and killed a further

eight. A similar episode had occurred on 25 June at the Kerem Shalom

kibbutz. Members of the radical wing of Hamas seized Corporal Gilad

Shalit, leading to the death of two fellow soldiers. The government of

Israel’s prime minister, Ehud Olmert, had responded by initiating a

vast military offensive in the Gaza Strip, leading to the arrest of, among

others, 9 members of the Palestinian government and 20 parliamentarians.

The two events were closely related: the Hezbollah leader, Hassan

Nasrallah, stated that the movement, with this gesture, had intended to

support the struggle of Hamas, as well as solicit an exchange of prisoners.

The reaction of Israel was once again expeditious: the “asymmetric”

war lasted 34 days, with over 1,500 dead. The risk of the conflict

spreading—with the indirect involvement of Syria and Iran, traditional

supporters and financiers of Hezbollah—and the diffusion in the Middle

East of a belief in terrorism as an indisputable instrument for the

defense of national causes were evident. In the background was Iraq,

by now subject to increasingly severe convulsions.

Restricted access

Deborah Snow Molloy and Robert M. Briwa

drones routinely buzz the path where I take my evening runs. San Angelo, the West Texas city where I live and teach university geography, is approximately 150 miles north of the US-Mexico border. Since 2016, the city's airfield hosts two US Border Patrol

Free access

Undocumented People (En)Counter Border Policing

Near and Far from the US Border

Denise Brennan

, they decide, often in split seconds, whether, for example, to issue a ticket for driving without a license or to pull in the firepower of the federal government and alert Border Patrol or ICE. They also have the authority to decide whether to proceed

Restricted access

Somy Kim

their height in controversy on campuses across the United States and news media picked up stories about Mexican “fiestas” with college students dressed up as border patrol and “illegals,” to “Compton Cookout” parties with students dressed up as gangsters

Open access

“Close to the skin”

Conceptualizing the intimate functioning of the US–Mexico border

Miranda Dahlin

and interactions between Border Patrol agents and emergency responders during these calls, that Jusionyte clearly outlines the contradiction between the two hands of the state ( Bourdieu 2014 ). The state, she demonstrates, both harms and cares, it

Open access

Rebecca M. Schreiber

for the border patrol to pass, then used a massive aluminum ladder to surmount the wall into the United States. But he hurt his leg on the way down, he recalls, and five minutes into walking through the desert, he looked up from the hot ground to find

Restricted access

US–México border states and the US military–industrial complex

A Global Space for expanding transnational capital

Juan Manuel Sandoval Palacios

economic subordination” (p. 163). In a more recent study, Dunn (2009 , pp. 215–228) notes, since late 2005 a growing role of the county sheriff´s office in immigration enforcement, the introduction of National Guard troops to aid the Border Patrol, the

Open access

Dirty Work, Dangerous Others

The Politics of Outsourced Immigration Enforcement in Mexico

Wendy Vogt

states and their more powerful neighbours remain spaces of contestation. Note 1 Mexican migration to the United States has dropped to numbers not seen since the 1970s. In 2000, the US Border Patrol apprehended over 1.6 million Mexicans at the