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‘Dice la nuestra novia’ (Says Our Bride)

Music and Poetry in the Wedding Songs of the Moroccan Sephardim

Susana Weich-Shahak

de novia , with which the Moroccan Sephardim accompanied the different stages that made up the Sephardi wedding: courtship and choice of partner, engagement, the preparation and exhibition of the dowry, the bride's ritual bath, the marriage ceremony

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Danai S. Mupotsa

Becoming-girl-woman-bride refers to the various positions and transformations of the bride. The girl and the bride as related in becoming-bride are the site of intense sociocultural investment and anxiety played out in the central role the bride takes in the wedding ritual. I draw from autoethnographic material, interviews, and bridal magazines, specifically those in circulation in South Africa that include representations of black women as brides. I conclude this article with an argument about the black femme as a so-called girly line of flight that produces our image of common sense, albeit with a different relation to visibility. Moving from the premise that common sense is overwhelmed by the visual sense, I position the black femme in relation to the image of common sense and I offer a reading of how images produce a range of simultaneous identifications and disidentifications, particularly in relation to the image of the ideal bride.

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Miniature Bride or Little Girl Religious

First Communion Clothing in Post-war Spanish Culture and Society

Jessamy Harvey

The tradition of religious clothing for children is relatively unexplored: this article develops the premise that debates about the links between the sacred and the market go deeper than concern about consumption, and bring to the surface issues of identity. Through exploring the historical development of the First Communion, not as religious ritual but as Catholic consumer culture, the article turns to analyse girls' communicant dress in Spain between the 1940s and 1960s which were the early decades of a dictatorial Regime (1939 to 1975) marked by an ideology of National-Catholicism. General Francisco Franco y Bahamonde, leader of the military rebellion against the elected government in 1936, ruled Spain until his death. One of my aims is to correct a tendency to make the little girl dressed in bridal wear the most visible sign because to do so disregards the cultural practice of wearing clothing to perform piety, signal a vocation or express gratitude for religious intercession.

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Growing Up Married

In Conversation with Eylem Atakav

Zahra Khosroshahi

According to the international humanitarian agency, Co-operative for Assistance and Care Everywhere (CARE), 39,000 girls under the age of 18 become child brides every single day. 1 While the numbers are alarming, these cases are mostly hidden from

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Paul Delany

bride, in order to limit his assimilation into the worldly milieu of Oxford. Berlin silently resisted this tribal imperative. The women he was attracted to were predominantly gentile; at the same time, that they were gentile could be an excuse for

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Stanley Chojnacki

, married in January 1438, was already in a grain-importing partnership with his new father-in-law by March of that year, at the same time that he was keeping his own father’s accounts. 14 In a marriage contract of 1529, the bride’s father promised to

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Inaudito exemplo

The Abduction of Romsey’s Abbess

Linda D. Brown

When Marie, the daughter of England’s King Stephen and Queen Matilda of Boulogne, was oblated to God as a child, she became Christ’s bride. Her new religious status as sanctimonialis veiled her with a nominal protection against sexual and marital

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Ziyodakhon Rasulova

With a focus on the Republic of Uzbekistan, this article aims to explain the enduring survival of the custom known as qalin (bride price, bride money), in spite of efforts to eliminate it in the past, and seeks to reveal the incomprehensible - even somewhat enigmatic - reasons for its present existence. Because this practice was burdensome for poor people, some attempts were made to abolish or replace it, for example, by having the bridegroom work instead of paying the qalin, by interchanging girls between two families or by having the bride's kinsmen cover the costs of the wedding. One custom even involved paying a qalin by instalments. As the article demonstrates, despite criticisms and its negative aspects, the qalin still has a place in the lives of Uzbeks.

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The nationalization of desire

Transnational marriage in Dutch culturist integration discourse

Willem Schinkel

Dutch discourse on “integration” is currently characterized by a strong focus on the “culture” of especially Turks and Moroccans, two minority populations in Dutch society mostly of Muslim orientation. This article discusses the issue of the “import bride” as a case study of contemporary culturist discourse. It argues that this issue is problematized because transnational marriage is construed as circumventing loyalty to Dutch society and nation-state.

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Zoya Tarasova

Sakha epic songs, collectively called olongkho, embody the Sakha people's religious and mythological traditions. The olongkhos recount fascinating and dramatic connections between humans and deities, and portray ancient Sakha rituals. This article examines the roles of female characters in the epic "N'urgun Bootur the Swift," recorded by Platon Oiunskii. Female roles in this epic include goddesses, female shamans (udaghan), abducted beauties (bride or sister of the hero), and female warriors. The article compares these roles to the historical image of women in past and present Sakha culture, and interprets the underlying message of the olongkho for today's generation.