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Michael Atkinson and Michael Kehler

There has been a dramatic rise in public, and particularly the media, attention directed at concerns regarding childhood obesity, and body shape/contents/images more broadly. Yet amidst the torrential call for increased attention on so-called “body epidemics” amongst youth in Canada and elsewhere, links between youth masculinities and bodily health (or simply, appearance) are largely unquestioned. Whilst there is a well-established literature on the relationship between, for example, body image and marginalized femininities, qualitative studies regarding boys and their body images (and how they are influenced within school settings) remain few and far between. In this paper, we offer insight into the dangerous and unsettled spaces of high school locker-rooms and other “gym zones” as contexts in which particular boys face ritual (and indeed, systematic) bullying and humiliation because their bodies (and their male selves) simply do not “measure up.” We draw on education, masculinities, health, and the sociology of bodies literature to examine how masculinity is policed by boys within gym settings as part of formal/informal institutional regimes of biopedagogy. Here, Foucault’s (1967) notion of heterotopia is drawn heavily upon in order to contextualize physical education class as a negotiated and resisted liminal zone for young boys on the fringes of accepted masculinities in school spaces.

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Mofeyisara Oluwatoyin Omobowale, Offiong Esop Akpabio, and Olukemi Kehinde Amodu

, among other forms of social reactions. All these negative reactions may result in bullying ( Birkett and Espelage 2015 ). Over the years, many studies have examined masculinity in relation to adolescents, especially in Africa, but many of these have

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Becoming a Super-Masculine “Cool Guy”

Reflexivity, Dominant and Hegemonic Masculinities, and Sexual Violence

James W. Messerschmidt

of the adolescent boys (see Messerschmidt 2016 for the full life story )—which is the subject of this article—reveals a close relationship among in-school bullying, reflexivity, embodiment, and dominant and hegemonic masculinities in understanding

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Michael Herzfeld

spitting in all directions, the best-known Greek defense against the evil eye. Greece has for too long been the favourite victim of Western European bullying for its insolence in pulling off such a dramatic success to be allowed to stand. But Greece has

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Ming-Lun Chung

This article explores the scale of bullying in Taiwanese schools and the impact of anti-bullying policies. As indicated by different types of research and surveys (academic investigation, nonprofit organization survey, and government projects), the

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Barbara Roche Rico

times of intercultural tension. Among the elements not yet remarked upon is their sustained attention to the issue of bullying long before the topic became a popular one in young adult literature ( Bennet 2011 ; Hillsberg and Spak 2006 ; Pytash et al

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"From the Top on Down It Is Systemic"

Bullying, Privilege and the Schooling of Hegemonic Masculinity

Brett G. Stoudt

In order to better understand the socialization and (re)production of privilege, most especially gendered privilege, within elite independent schools it is important to examine the masculine performances of its students enacted through bullying as well as the masculine environments in which these enactments are produced. This paper will begin explicating the messages received and the representations shaped by Rockport’s hegemonic masculine curriculum and the embodiment of these dynamics through research on bullying conducted with students and faculty at an elite, single-sex independent boys school, Rockport. The data revealed that bullying between boys at Rockport helped to discipline and reproduce hegemonic masculine boundaries; it was as much an expression of Rockport’s culture as it was a vehicle for policing and reproducing its culture. However, not only were the boys within Rockport gendered, the faculty and even the institution itself was gendered. In this way, it was systemic, both students and faculty acted within this institutional culture and held and managed expectations about their gender.

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Deevia Bhana and Emmanuel Mayeza

In this article we focus on sixty South African primary schoolgirls’ experiences of male violence and bullying. Rejecting outmoded constructions of schoolgirls as passive, we examine how girls draw on different forms of femininity to manage and address violence at school. These femininities are non-normative in their advancing of violence to stop violence but are also imbued with culturally relevant meanings about care, forgiveness, and humanity based on the African principle of ubuntu. Moving away from the discursive production of girls’ victimhood, we show how girls construct their own agency as they actively participate in multiple forms of femininity advocating both violence and forgiveness. Given the absence of teacher and parental support for girls’ safety, we conclude with a call to address interventions contextually, from schoolgirls’ own perspectives.

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Confronting Tyranny in a Public Health Agency

Crafting a ‘Philosophy of Praxis’ into a ‘Community of Resistance’

Brian McKenna

. The book details how Coleman-Adebay, an African-American, suffered enormous retaliation through racism, sexism and bullying in an effort to keep her quiet after about the corruption she found, as part of her job assignment. She refused. After years of

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The Girl

Dead

Fiona Nelson

of this one book represents a massive jump in the mainstreaming of this narrative about teen girls. Two areas of research interest come together for me in this article. The first is an increasing concern with the sorts of gender-based bullying faced