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Le Rire and the Meaning of Cartoon Art in Fin-de-Siècle France

Andrew Kotick

In November 1894, a young Parisian upstart entrepreneur, journalist, and former army officer at the École militaire de Saint-Cyr founded a new weekly tabloid dedicated to showcasing the best talent in cartoon art, caricature, and satire. The

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Jonathan Sacks

A Personal Memoir

Tony Bayfield

first meeting, however, was of a cartoon of Sacks, up on the wall to my left. It showed him with two heads, facing in opposite directions. One was Dr Sacks, the urbane pipe-smoking Cambridge philosophy don. The other was Rabbi Sacks in full rabbinic garb

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The Cartoon Controversy

Creating Muslims in a Danish Setting

Anja Kublitz

This article offers a situational analysis of the printing of cartoons about the Islamic Prophet in a Danish newspaper in 2005 and the ensuing demonstration by Danish Muslims. It suggests that rather than simply sparking protests, the 'cartoon controversy' created a space for possible actions and a political platform for Muslims all over the world. Based on a review of the historical development of the national Danish discourse on immigrants, the article conveys how the cartoon controversy became instrumental in transforming this discourse. As a major creative event, it not only ridiculed a dominant religious symbol but simultaneously created a space for the becoming of Muslims in Denmark and beyond.

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The Cartoon Emperor

The Impact of Louis Napoleon Bonaparte on European Comic Art, 1848–1870

Richard Scully

Louis Napoleon Bonaparte (1808-1873), one-time President of the Second French Republic (1848-1852) and Emperor of the French (as Napoleon III, 1852-1870) exercised a profound effect on European cartoonists and the comic art they produced during his lifetime. As a real historical personality, Louis Napoleon feared the power of the cartoon to make him appear ridiculous and instituted one of the most effective and heavy-handed regimes of censorship of comic art in all European history. Beyond the boundaries of the French Empire, he pressured neighbouring states to protect his image in similar fashion, but in Britain and Germany and beyond, the cartoon Napoleon III became not only ubiquitous in the satirical press, but also served as a powerful touchstone for emerging national identities. The real Louis Napoleon's political and military influence was felt throughout Europe for over two decades, but his cartoon self was even more of a European phenomenon. Usually studied within national contexts, the 'Cartoon Emperor' needs to be studied transnationally in order fully to grasp his importance for developments in European history, as in European comic art.

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Women's Liberation

Swedish Feminist Comics and Cartoons from the 1970s and 1980s

Anna Nordenstam and Margareta Wallin Wictorin

expanding field. Most, but not all, of the comics that are analysed are sequential, consisting of several panels with interpretable gutters in between, but a majority of the images in the investigated material are cartoons, that is, drawings in one frame

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Narrative Markers in Pablo Picasso’s Tragicomic Strip The Dream and Lie of Franco

Michael Schuldiner

markers that outline the narrative, as this article will. The best discussion to date of Dream and Lie is in Viñetas en el frente [Cartoons on the front line], produced by the Picasso Museum in Málaga. 9 Cartoons on the Front Line provides the most

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Narrating Muslim Girlhood in the Pakistani Cityscape of Graphic Narratives

Tehmina Pirzada

employ the format of what could be loosely termed a cartoon to portray Muslim girlhood, 2 while simultaneously drawing attention to the medium of the cartoon itself. Reviled by conservative Muslims for its perceived use as caricature but considered a

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The Adventures of a Cartoon Strip Character with a Quiff and a Dog

Tintin's Journeys as an Original Form of Travel Writing

Loïc Loykie Lominé

Georges Rémi (better known as Hergé, a pseudonym made up of his two initials: R G) died in 1983, having made a name as the father of the modern cartoon strip in Western Europe, notably thanks to 23 books narrating the adventures of a betufted boy reporter called Tintin. Tintinology (literally and unambiguously: the study of Tintin) started to develop in the mid-1980s as a small-scale, possibly amusing, area of scholarship – yet one where an increasing number of academics have analysed Tintin and his stories in the light of the most serious intellectual theories, from psychoanalysis (David 1994; Peeters 1984; Tisseron 1985, 1990, 1993) to semiology (Floch 2002) via cultural studies (Masson 1989; Baetens 1990; Bonfand and Marion 1996 ; Tomasi and Deligne 1998). The critical literature on Tintin is expanding alongside the literature on Hergé himself (Tisseron 1987; Smolderen and Sterckx 1988; Ajame 1991; Assouline 1996; Serres 2000; Peeters 2002; Sadoul 2003). This article contributes to this body of Tintin meta-literature by focusing on the way Tintin travelled around the world, from China (The Blue Lotus) to Peru (Prisoners of the Sun) and from Egypt (Cigars of the Pharaoh) to the Arctic Ocean (The Shooting Star).

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Book Reviews

Ekaterina Tikhonyuk and Mark McKinney

John Etty, Graphic Satire in the Soviet Union: Krokodil' s Political Cartoons (Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2019). 276 pp. ISBN: 978-1496821089 ($30) John Etty's recent book represents a holistic and meticulous study of

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Interview with Steve Bell

David Morgan

The visual-satirical cartoons of Steve Bell have been a vivid feature of British political life for several decades. Bell's cartoons have been a mainstay of the left-leaning Guardian newspaper since the 1980s. His acerbic and occasionally