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Jan Ifversen

dramatic nature such as revolution, crisis, and catastrophe. As mentioned, I am mostly interested in changes for the worse and will concentrate on concepts such as crisis and catastrophe. Let us take a closer look at the semantics of crisis . Inspired by

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Adolfo Lucero Álvarez, Columba Rodríguez Alviso, Oscar Frausto Martínez, José Luis Aparicio López, Alejandro Díaz Garay, and Maximino Reyes Umaña

catastrophes ( Holt, 2006 ). These phenomena can cause millions of dollars in losses by destroying homes, damaging public transport infrastructure and hospitals, and limiting access to the resources necessary to survive, such as water, food, and health

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Ailise Bulfin

This article explores late Victorian fictions of natural catastrophe and their relationship to contemporary developments in the natural sciences. During this era, popular culture had become saturated with an 'apocalyptic imaginary' – a myriad of images of degeneration, total war and the fall of civilisation. While the majority of popular catastrophe texts turn on disasters of a man-made, military nature, including global wars, nationalist uprisings, and domestic revolutions, a significant subset employ natural disaster as the means of catastrophe – some dramatising the astronomical theories of cometary collision or the heat death of the sun, and others postulating meteorological and geological disasters such as volcanic eruption, earthquake, fog, ice, flood, and even climate change. These include H.G. Wells and George Griffith's tales of comet strike, M.P. Shiel and Grant Allen's volcano tales, and William Delisle Hay, Robert Barr and Fred M. White's accounts of deadly fog. This article relates this little-known body of texts to developing Victorian concerns about the sustainability of human life on earth, arguing that by focusing on determining the causes of the catastrophes depicted it is possible to see links emerging between 'natural' catastrophe and human activity in Victorian thinking and hence the development of an ecological awareness.

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Patrick Ffrench

Sartre's recollection, in Les Mots, of his first visit to the cinema is a multi-layered and ambivalent text through which Sartre proposes a number of interlocking arguments: concerning the contrast between the 'sacred' space of the theatre and the non-ceremonial space of the cinema, between the theatre as associated with paternal authority, and the cinema as associated with a clandestine bond with the mother. But the text also sets up a quasi-sociological account of the public Sartre encounters in the cinema itself as revealing to him the truth of the social bond, a truth he expresses with the term 'adherence', and which he says he only rediscovered in his experience of being a prisoner in the Stalag in 1940. Rather than the basis of a sociological account of the social bond, which would seem at odds with Sartre's social philosophy, I read this as the expression of a desire for physical proximity. The space of the cinema thus develops a fantasy, and this is in continuity with the role of the cinema in the evolution traced in Les Mots, in which it is described as instigating a withdrawal into imaginary life and an indulgence in daydreaming. Through reference to Christian Metz and to Roland Barthes, whose essay 'En sortant du cinéma' is proposed as a parallel and a response to Sartre, I suggest that the 'true bond' of adherence which Sartre encounters is an unconscious rather than an epistemological truth.

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Wulf Kansteiner

Omer Bartov, Mirrors of Destruction: War, Genocide, and Modern Identity (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000)

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Seumas Bates

During ethnographic research conducted in rural, southern Louisiana into the recovery from Hurricane Katrina and the Deepwater Horizon/BP oil spill, local narratives surrounding the impact of these catastrophes often contrasted their present

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Nathan Bracher

humanist. Ivan Jablonka 2 Appearing in English translation in the first half of 2016, some four years after their publication in the original French, both Ivan Jablonka’s A History of the Grandparents I Never Had and Henry Rousso’s The Latest Catastrophe

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Laurie Kain Hart

expose the invisibilized effects of twentieth-century state violence on everyday acts of dwelling in the long term. In his remarkable study of the transmission of ‘grievous loss’ after mass political catastrophe in twentieth-century China, Taiwan, and

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Environmental Configurations

When the River Zayandeh Rud Stopped Crossing Isfahan

Sahar Faeghi and Sophie Roche

. The relationships themselves are resources. An Approaching Catastrophe Over the past decade, the river has vanished, dried out, been diverted and been overused before entering the city. ‘Zayandeh Rood River has become a wastewater drain and is

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Hebrew Dystopias

From National Catastrophes to Ecological Disasters

Netta Bar Yosef-Paz

novels in the first group conjoin a national crisis with an ecological disaster to bring about the catastrophe, those in the second group present the national devastation due to environmental recklessness as an expression of moral corruption, linking