Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • "cheerleader" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Alpha Girls and Cheerleading

Negotiating New Discourses with Old Practices

Natalie Guice Adams and Pamela J. Bettis

In Alpha Girls: Understanding the New American Girl and How She is Changing the World, psychologist Dan Kindlon (2006) claims that the new psychology of girls has produced a dramatically different kind of girl from her 1990s girl-in-crisis predecessor. He proposes that this new type of girl is a hybrid, personifying the best traits of masculinity and femininity. The Alpha Girl represents a new form of girlhood in which girls are seen as the economic, social, and cultural winners in the twenty first century because they are risk takers, competitive, and collaborative. How does cheerleading, one of the most female-identified and sexualized cultures of adolescent life, coexist with this seemingly new discourse of empowering girlhood? We argue that cheerleading provides a rich space for Girls Studies scholars to analyze how modes of femininity play out in the social practices that girls themselves deem important.

Restricted access

Delphine Letort

The controversies triggered by the Netflix adaptation of Jay Asher’s young adult novel Thirteen Reasons Why (2007) have focused on suicide and downplayed discussions of rape as a central plot device. Making use of stereotypical characters (such as the cheerleader and the jock) and archetypal setting (including the high school), 13 Reasons Why delves into the reassuring world of the suburban town; it deals ambiguously with the entwined notions of gender and power encapsulated in the teenpic genre. A detailed analysis of the series indeed reveals that its causative narrative reinforces the rape myth by putting the blame on girls for events that happen to them. In this article I explore the tensions of a TV series that endorses the rape myth through the entertaining frame of the teenpic.

Free access

“Loving and Cruel, All at the Same Time”

Girlhood Identity in The Craft

Emily Chandler

Vampire Slayer ( 1997–2003 ) and The Secret Circle ( 2011–2012 ), and the films The Covenant ( 2006 ) and All Cheerleaders Die ( 2014 ), as well as films using the supernatural or paranormal as a metaphor for adolescent angst, such as The Faculty

Restricted access

Dis-orienting Western Knowledge

Coloniality, Curriculum and Crisis

Zeus Leonardo

assimilated the European canon if only later to be able to interrogate it. He did not accomplish this feat without also enjoying in no small way the pleasures of engaging the ‘great works’. He is not a cheerleader of popular culture and took some pride in

Free access

I’m Not Loud, I’m Outspoken

Narratives of Four Jamaican Girls’ Identity and Academic Success

Rowena Linton and Lorna McLean

religious gatherings, and singing. One participant is an avid pianist. While all four participants lived in different family settings, two lived with both parents, and all four girls credit their mother as being their number one cheerleader regardless of